Can you see Emory trending female?

I’m non-binary and strongly considering [name_u]Emory[/name_u] as my name… [name_m]Can[/name_m] you see it trending female in the future? The last thing I want is for my name to become completely gendered…

It has risen quite significantly for girls in the past few years - entered the charts in 2011 and climbed its way up to #465.

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I think it sounds kind of early 2000s/1990s, and that spelling doesn’t look very feminine.

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[name_u]Emery[/name_u] definitely is trending female, but [name_u]Emory[/name_u] feels much more unisex to me. In 2022 there were 678 baby girls named [name_u]Emory[/name_u], and 286 baby boys.

There were more boys named [name_u]Emery[/name_u] last year — 354 — but when you compare it to the 2,961 baby girl Emery’s, I think its safe to say that spelling has gone to the girls.

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I can also agree that the [name_u]Emery[/name_u] spelling is fully trending feminine. [name_f]Every[/name_f] person I’ve met with this name in all spellings, including [name_u]Emory[/name_u], has been female.

However! I think [name_u]Emory[/name_u], in the same vein as [name_u]Avery[/name_u], [name_u]Quinn[/name_u], [name_u]Devin[/name_u], and the like, retains an air of gender neutrality that is part of what is appealing to parents looking for a name for their daughter that has that quality. I think Emory’s history of gender neutral use means this spelling will still be not too gendered on paper. The name is one you might want to rethink in terms of sound, though, especially if you ever present more feminine but would not want your identity assumed.

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While it does feel more feminine than masculine to me, I don’t think it feels completely feminine either, it’s definitely gender neutral, and I don’t think most people would assume someone named [name_u]Emory[/name_u] was female just by the name alone (though it could happen, I don’t know). I think it could work well for a non-binary person.

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This is a UK perspective, but this spelling in particular does feel far more neutral to me

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I completely agree with @ellerbea , while [name_u]Emery[/name_u] feels more feminine, [name_u]Emory[/name_u] feels super neutral to me, even leaning slightly more masculine

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[name_u]Emory[/name_u] does have a more feminine sound to me, due to its similarity to [name_u]Emery[/name_u], [name_f]Emily[/name_f], [name_u]Ivory[/name_u], etc. I agree with other posters that it has a more gender-neutral flair to it, but I’d probably assume female if I heard about an [name_u]Emory[/name_u] (although I wouldn’t be surprised to learn I’m wrong!)

I’m coming at this from a European perspective, of course, but the statistics Kipperbo1 and marysia mentioned do pretty much show the same thing, where it’s gender neutral but leaning feminine somewhat strongly, with 1/3 male Emorys to 2/3 female Emorys. And there’s the worry about it getting mixed up with [name_u]Emery[/name_u] (an easy mistake, in my opinion) which is overwhelmingly skewed female.

So I guess it depends on what your personal limit is! Would you be okay having a name that reads as more feminine (and might be more likely to be assumed as female) if it’s still overall considered unisex, or would it bother you?

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i don’t know but i do know of a girl called either Emery/Emory-Kate or Emily-Kate so it is close to [name_f]Emily[/name_f] and [name_u]Emery[/name_u] which view as female so i guess yes.

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