Database entries you’d like to see amended

I’m not sure how this happened, but no

Meaning and description don’t match

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just found a tiny thing — the entry for [name_u]Blu[/name_u] says that it’s the name of one of the Waldrop quintuplets, who are actually sextuplets :slight_smile:

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The entry for [name_f]Cinnamon[/name_f] could be improved, it says “saffron is the only spice name we have a taste for” and kind of dismisses [name_f]Cinnamon[/name_f]. There are plenty of other spice names like [name_u]Clove[/name_u], [name_u]Pepper[/name_u], [name_f]Anise[/name_f], and even [name_u]Basil[/name_u] that are known, so it’s an odd entry

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[name_f]Tiny[/name_f] thing – Briar rose: Name Meaning, Popularity, and Similar Names | Nameberry

It should be ‘Briar Rose’, not ‘Briar rose’. :slight_smile:

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Double barrelled names appear like that. Interesting

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Must be an old thing! Either way, both parts of the double barrel are supposed to be capitalised haha

From the page on [name_m]Rembrandt[/name_m]:

The name of the most renowned of the Old Masters is a potential, if problematic, option for families who put an emphasis on the creative.

I can’t think of any reason why this name is described as “problematic” (other than the spelling? But it’s not that difficult compared with many other names). To me, it seems like an unfairly negative word to use, especially as “problematic” can be used to mean racist, sexist, etc.

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From the page on [name_m]Ringo[/name_m] (Ringo: Name Meaning, Popularity, and Similar Names | Nameberry) :

“Better to stick with [name_m]John[/name_m], [name_m]Paul[/name_m], or George.”

Not a huge issue, of course— just though I’d mention it :blush:

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[name_m]Ravine[/name_m] is listed as a variant of [name_u]Raven[/name_u], when I think it should just be defined as it’s own word name. A ravine is a small narrow steep-sided valley that is larger than a gully and smaller than a canyon and that is usually worn by running water. If [name_m]Cliff[/name_m] is a name, why not [name_m]Ravine[/name_m]?

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Not that big of a deal but [name_f]Selah[/name_f] is listed as meaning “rock” and then in the description it says “Given its context in the Bible, [name_f]Selah[/name_f] is likely to mean “to praise” or “pause and reflect upon what has just been said.”" But [name_f]Sela[/name_f] is listed as meaning “rock” then it says [name_f]Lauryn[/name_f] Hill’s daughter is [name_f]Selah[/name_f] “pronounced the same but with a different derivation and meaning.” - so the two pages are a bit confusing as to whether the names both mean rock with different spellings or if they’re totally different names.

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On the page for the name [name_f]Marjani[/name_f], it says that [name_f]Marjani[/name_f] Satrapi is the author of the graphic novel Persepolis, but her name is actually Marjane.

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[name_f]Dee[/name_f] is only currently listed as a girl name. In the UK, especially but not exclusively in [name_m]Wales[/name_m], [name_f]Dee[/name_f] is used as a boy name after the [name_u]River[/name_u] [name_f]Dee[/name_f].

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[name_m]Bnaya[/name_m] is currently listed as meaning unknown. It is a non-Anglicised spelling of [name_m]Benaiah[/name_m].

[name_m]Benaiah[/name_m] itself has a mistake in the meaning. It does not mean son of G-d, though I can see why people might make that mistake. It means “G-d builds” or “built by G-d” from the Hebrew verb bna בנה which means build, not the noun ben נן which means son.

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I’m not sure if I’m right, but to me it seems like some people misunderstand nameberry’s concept.

I don’t think nameberry tries to be purely factual. Some other website are more neutral and only focus on meaning, history and etymology. Nameberry also tries to recommend certain names and advice against others and it uses more subjective language.

(I do think that some describtions are indeed too harsh and it would be better to change those.)

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this was more meant in the context of a negative slant on a name. i get having a slant to the commentary. and usually they are witty and positive. but unless it’s a valid warning, it is better to have no slant than a negative slant.

it could even be some writers who just don’t do the sarcasm as well. and it ends up reading as mean instead of in jest.

Okay, thank you for explaining! Also, I meant my comment more in general, not neccesarily directly to you :blush: .

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totally same :relaxed: mine was more to clarify than anything else

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I was looking at the page for the name [name_f]Aela[/name_f], but the lists under “Famous People Named Aela” and “Aela in Pop Culture” are for the name [name_u]Trini[/name_u] instead.

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i feel like pippa’s entry should mention that it has vulgar meanings in both swedish and greek (it is slang for sex in swedish, and means blowjob in greek) . it still slaps as a name, but if i were an expectant parent, i would want to know.

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Is it intentional that “Unknown” is in the database? Right now the page for it is empty, if it’s supposed to be in there then adding anything - even just “english word name” - would help to clarify that this is not a mistake.

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