I have a naming gap!

The bomber gap was a hoax. My naming gap isn’t.
My file of interesting girls’ names is much longer than my file of interesting boys’ names. Why is it so much easier to find girls’ names I like?
There seem to be fewer boys’ names in use in the first place. The fact that 1/4 of ranked boys’ names have always been there, compared to 1/8 of the girls’ names, shows this. Also, it shows how much slower boys’ names cycle, leading to my next problem.
I want really uncommon names. I don’t draw a distinction between “trendy” and “stable popular”, common is always too common. However, it seems boys’ names rarely die as hard as girls’ names. What’s worse, it seems there are fewer boys’ names off the list. As pointed out here https://nameberry.com/blog/2010/08/06/cool-unusual-boys-names-the-best-100/ most rare boys’ names are spelling variations, unusual surname names, and word and place names. This explains why my “interesting boys’ names” list is dominated by surname names. It’s not that they’re the only style I like; it’s that there don’t seem to be enough underused examples of the other styles I like.
I’ve noticed some people are more concerned about popularity for girls. I’m fair in this regard.
I’m disappointed that I seem to consider rarity a virtue in itself. However, even apart from commonness, I have a problem. It was already obvious when I was a teenager. I didn’t know the current popularity lists, so I came up with a more “honest” list of names. It was really hard for me to find boys’ names even then. That is, I like far more common girls’ names than common boys’ names, and far more unusual girls’ names than unusual boys’ names.
The slower cycling of boys’ names creates a real problem for me. If a name is in constant common use, I don’t consider it “classic”. I usually consider it boring.
If I consider a name unisex, I’ll only use it on girls. I guess you could call my definition contradictory, then. Note that I mean names I consider unisex. [name]Riley[/name], [name]Elliott[/name] and [name]Quinn[/name] are still boys’ names only. [name]Ashley[/name], [name]Whitney[/name] and [name]Courtney[/name] are girls. Naturally, this practice depletes the boys’ name list.
Then there are names I like but won’t use. My biggest problem is that my last name ends schwa-n, and I don’t want a first name ending the same. This rules out many girls’ names, including many I’d otherwise like, but even more boys’ names. (To recall Nameberry - Welcome to the Nameberry Forums a recent thread, [name]Vivienne[/name] is acceptable re: sound, [name]Vivian[/name] isn’t - and that relies on you being able to hear and say the difference.)
Language origin is also a factor. I have no taste for Hebrew names at all, and there are far more boys than girls with Hebrew names. I recognize that my language tastes aren’t the same between genders anyway. Still, I’m disappointed that the language supplying several of my absolute favorite girls’ names (Persian) has supplied essentially no male names at all to English! Some languages (French, Russian) are endless sources of ultrafeminine girls, but I’m not so easily sold on their boys.
I like both short and long names. However, most short boys’ names I like aren’t rare enough. (A lot of the girls aren’t either, but it’s easy enough to find names I like that are.) And on the other end… what is the male equivalent of feminissima? My tastes don’t run to ‘romantic’ Italian or Spanish boys’ names (not too much that way for girls, either) nor to such names as [name]Tristan[/name], [name]Sebastian[/name] and [name]Gabriel[/name] that are sometimes offered for that request.
I first thought a large part of the problem was that cute girls’ names are appealing, but I don’t want cute boys’ names. Then I realized that wasn’t it, since I almost never find male names “cute” in the first place.
Examples of what I do like:
short, strong “hero” names that were in style in the 50s-60s ([name]Scott[/name], [name]Craig[/name], [name]Neil[/name], [name]Vance[/name], [name]Hal[/name], [name]Kirk[/name]… I’d group [name]Nash[/name] with these; I’m surprised it’s only ranked in modern times)
Scottish ([name]Alistair[/name], [name]Hamish[/name], [name]Sinclair[/name], [name]Carlisle[/name]… I suppose I could say “Scottish and sounds upper-crusty”)
Germanic and very old English names ([name]Warner[/name], [name]Wilhelm[/name]), particularly D-ending ([name]Roland[/name], [name]Conrad[/name], [name]Leopold[/name], [name]Maynard[/name], [name]Willard[/name], [name]Bayard[/name]… note that many of these are on the “most dated” lists)
[name]Le/nameland would get on the list if it were said layland rather than leeland. It seems I like the long A sound in the middle of a name, not just at Nameberry - Welcome to the Nameberry Forums the end of girls’ names. Hate it at the beginning (I want to say [name]Ava[/name] like avenue, [name]Avalon[/name], avatar).
You can find a softer name that I like, though it takes some searching and many are guilty pleasures.
[name]Perry[/name], [name]Westley[/name], [name]Beauchamp[/name] (pronounced the French way, not [name]Beecham[/name] - at least in [name]Canada[/name] I hope I could get people to say that), [name]Deveraux[/name], wouldn’t even think [name]Lafayette[/name] sounded like a girl but probably wouldn’t use for other reasons, would love [name]Pascal[/name] but it’s not my religion.
Unusual unclassifiable: [name]Woodrow[/name], [name]Casimir[/name]…
Assorted I can’t use for sound and/or commonness: [name]Mitchell[/name], [name]Sullivan[/name], [name]Hadrian[/name], [name]Max[/name][anything], [name]Liam[/name] (or does this more belong on “names I used to like”?), [name]Carter[/name], [name]Carson[/name], [name]Preston[/name], [name]Damian[/name], [name]Grant[/name], [name]Harrison[/name], [name]Marshall[/name], [name]Russell[/name], [name]Malcolm[/name], [name]Coleman[/name], [name]Reed[/name]/[name]Reid[/name]… Note many of these are only “like a little” (and the list isn’t in preference order). That is, I actively dislike the majority of male names I know.
Examples of currently stylish I don’t like: [name]Jasper[/name], [name]Graham[/name] (particularly not as truncated by Americans), [name]Oliver[/name], [name]Miles[/name], [name]Asher[/name]
Can you suggest any other names or categories of names I should look at?
I’m not sure which is more disappointing: that my boys’ list is much shorter, or that I generally like the names on it less than I like the girls’.

No, I’m not having kids anytime soon. I do have enough boys’ names for real-life use. I was inspired to post this by thinking, “If I was [name]Feodor[/name] Vassilyev, I’d be in real trouble.”

I have the same sort of naming gap - actually, my complete failure to be excited by any boys’ names is so persistent that I might well hand over the vast majority of naming responsibility for sons to my future husband, so long as he lets me use the girl names which I love.

[name]How[/name] do you feel about very musty English names? [name]Elmo[/name], say, or [name]Horace[/name] (or [name]Horatio[/name], but that might be too romantic for your taste). In the same sort of vein, I like [name]Sherlock[/name], but it’s so obviously tied to one character that I think it’s out for first name use.

[name]Ptolemy[/name] doesn’t seem to have reason exponentially despite it being used by a celebrity (I can’t remember who), and lends itself nicely to the nickname Tolly.

[name]Virtue[/name] names are still good on boys, in my opinion, particularly in the middle slot - Courage, for example.

As for Germanic, [name]Klaus[/name] (KLOWS, with the last S being S as in snake, as opposed to almost a Z sound) is often thrown out because of the [name]Santa[/name] [name]Claus[/name] reference, but I think it’s a good name.

Finally, you might want to take a look at some Russian names. [name]Dimitri[/name] is a personal favourite and, although I suppose some people might find it a bit odd to use the Russian equivalent of a common English name if you’re not Russian yourself, I still like [name]Piotr[/name] and [name]Pavel[/name]. [name]EDIT[/name]: Sorry, I’ve just seen that in general you’re not fond of Russian boys’ names!

More distinctively Scottish names include [name]Mungo[/name], [name]Sorley[/name], [name]Callum[/name], [name]Angus[/name], [name]Conall[/name], [name]Bruce[/name] and [name]Ross[/name].

Other random ideas of names you might like include [name]Redford[/name], [name]Bernard[/name] (too canine?) and [name]Crispin[/name]. I can also think of a whole lot of names that you’ll probably term too romantic (especially if you’re not here in the UK), such as [name]Dorian[/name].

[name]Auburn[/name]

How do you feel about very musty English names? Elmo, say, or Horace (or Horatio, but that might be too romantic for your taste). In the same sort of vein, I like Sherlock, but it’s so obviously tied to one character that I think it’s out for first name use.

I don’t just find names in constant use old. I also have trouble considering names out of use for a while to sound new. I suppose I should look more into names rarely seen since medieval times. I’ve come across Redburg and Osburg for boys and Maryweld for girls.

I laugh at [name]Horatio[/name], and not because I’m one of the people who finds it intrinsically funny. I’m remembering one time when I said I didn’t like my name, and my father said “What do you wish you were called, [name]Horatio[/name]?” He apparently thought it was ridiculous. (And though it’s not my favorite name, yes, I would somewhat prefer it to my own.)

Ptolemy doesn’t seem to have reason exponentially despite it being used by a celebrity (I can’t remember who), and lends itself nicely to the nickname Tolly.

Yes, I do have a taste for odd classical names like that. But a further qualification: I’m not big on nicknames.

Virtue names are still good on boys, in my opinion, particularly in the middle slot - Courage, for example.

That one really doesn’t work for me. I do happen to like [name]Concord[/name] in the middle spot…

As for Germanic, Klaus (KLOWS, with the last S being S as in snake, as opposed to almost a Z sound) is often thrown out because of the Santa Claus reference, but I think it’s a good name.

[name]Klaus[/name] is (almost) my last name!

More distinctively Scottish names include Mungo, Sorley, Callum, Angus, Conall, Bruce and Ross.

I count being expected to like [name]Angus[/name] if there are Scottish names I like as similar to being expected to like [name]Boris[/name] or [name]Olga[/name] if you like Russian names. [name]Ross[/name] is more my style. Or [name]Duncan[/name], bu I don’t think I’d use that one myself. [name]Sorley[/name] and [name]Conall[/name] are listed here as Irish; I’ll consider them, but I don’t really expect they’ll make my list.

Other random ideas of names you might like include Redford, Bernard (too canine?) and Crispin. I can also think of a whole lot of names that you’ll probably term too romantic (especially if you’re not here in the UK), such as Dorian.

[name]Crispin[/name] is a real dislike. [name]Bernard[/name] is “eh”. [name]Redford[/name] is the only one that I really like - and I already knew that one.

The problem is that I keep finding new interesting girls’ names but only rarely boys’ names.

I agree! Boys names are impossible. Everything seems overused. Friends of ours just had sons in the last few days and named them [name]Nathan[/name] and [name]Benjamin[/name]. We have a dozen Finns nearby, and everyone else is [name]Henry[/name] or [name]Charlie[/name] or [name]Jack[/name] or [name]Noah[/name].

One name I thought I’d share, just in case: a friend recently suggested [name]Rasmus[/name]. She knows a [name]Rasmus[/name] who is Danish. He’s in his teens now, and his friends call him [name]Raz[/name] or Razzie.

Good luck with your process!

A name I forgot to add to my list: [name]Ragnar[/name]/[name]Rayner[/name]/[name]Rainier[/name] (though in the case of the last, I have to admit I prefer to pronounce it like the mountain, and I have trouble with the French pronunciation). I was just looking through the Legitimate [name]Baby[/name] Names blog. As usual, I found more interesting girls’ names.