Love it or hate it... my 2nd daughter has a unique name.

My husband and I named our 2nd daughter [name]Butterfly[/name] [name]Annsley[/name].

It threw my parents for a HUGE loop. My dad is a [name]Doctor[/name], and he found it difficult to share his new grandbaby’s name with his elite friends. So they called [name]Butterfly[/name] ‘the baby’ for ages. She’s six now, and not a baby any more! So after a few years, they finally adapted and had to use her name!

We live in [name]Africa[/name], and she is home schooled. Peer pressure isn’t a concern of mine. She LOVES her name, and it suits her!

I’m just curious, what do you think?
~[name]Kate[/name]

Good job! It’s a great name and even if she grows less enthusiastic about it as she gets older, she has a solid middle name she can fall back on. I know it’s hard to go with a name that relatives turn their nose up at. I live in the U.S. where my favorite name, [name]Jemima[/name], is unanimously despised because of a pancake syrup brand called “Aunt [name]Jemima[/name]” that features a black “mamie” as a spokesperson. I suspect this pancake syrup does not exist in the U.K. where [name]Jemima[/name] is a very popular name. Anyway, my husband’s family hates this name, as does pretty much everyone I know, so I have given up my dream of having a daughter named [name]Jemima[/name]. But yay for you and your [name]Butterfly[/name]!

You asked for honesty…

[name]May[/name] I ask why you chose the name [name]Butterfly[/name]? And is [name]Annsley[/name] said like [name]Ainsley[/name] or like [name]Anne[/name]+slee? What is your first daughter’s name?

Personally, I don’t think it matters if you live in [name]Africa[/name] and your child is homeschooled. People will have opinions wherever you go, especially if your daughter ever goes to or lives in the US, UK, or some other Western country. I think there are plenty of unique names that mean butterfly that I would’ve chosen over the actual name, [name]Butterfly[/name], for my child if I had an attachment to that meaning.

I’m sorry to offend!

“People are going to have opinions wherever you go.”

This is an interesting point. It is absolutely true, and it begs the question, how can you please everyone? If not all, how many people should you be trying to please with your child’s name? Or which people? Exactly where do you draw the line with considering outside opinions? As I mentioned, my husband and his family hate my favorite name, so I’ve abandoned all hope in using it, but I wonder sometimes where to draw the line when considering opinions. You mentioned that western culture in particular should be considered. I think that’s a little broad. She lives in [name]Africa[/name]. Should families all over the world consider the fact that one day their child may visit the U.S. or U.K. when naming their child? What if your kid one day visits [name]Africa[/name]? [name]Will[/name] its presumably Western name translate well to another culture? What will the Africans think? Oh, no!

I don’t think the issue is deciding which people to please or how many opinions to take into consideration. In my opinion, the question is, how will a child of name XX be received in her daily life (at school, at the park, at the grocery, etc), how will a teenager of name XX be received, how will an adult of name XX be received. Her name may appear on resumes, she may have to introduce herself over the phone in a professional environment (Hello, my name is XX), she will have to send e-mails or other written correspondence. What impression does name XX convey? [name]Will[/name] she be taken seriously? Obviously you can’t please everyone and I don’t think that is the parents’ job when naming their children.

[name]Butterfly[/name], in my opinion, is adorable for a child and conveys light-heartedness and happiness, just as a child should be. But I fear that it does not seem professional or grown up at all. What would you think if your doctor’s name was [name]Butterfly[/name]? What would you think if you saw [name]Butterfly[/name] on a ballot? What would you think if you called a company and the receptionist introduced herself as [name]Butterfly[/name]?

If I met an adult named [name]Butterfly[/name] tomorrow I might prejudicially assume she had hippie parents. I might scoff or smirk. However, fourteen years from now [did she say her child was six?], when this kid is an adult, should I encounter a [name]Butterfly[/name] on the ballot, or the phone, I doubt I will think much of it other than to note her generation and be surprised she doesn’t have a last name as a first name, a unisex name, or some kind of [name]Emma[/name], [name]Ella[/name], [name]Ada[/name], [name]Ava[/name] variation. By the time little [name]Butterfly[/name] is an adult, the world will be propagated by much more controversial or “unique” names and our sensibilities will have adapted to it. We might find [name]Butterfly[/name] to be a perfectly sensible, grown-up name in a world where kids will probably be named after typos or texting acronyms.

This is what I meant. I don’t think choosing a name for your child is about pleasing anyone, really, well except for maybe yourself and your husband. It is about choosing a name that will suite your child and provide him or her a solid foundation and a good foot to start out on. I fully believe a name can do that. A name says a lot about a person (or that person’s parents) whether intended or not. For instance, parents who chose [name]Charlotte[/name] for their child, and the little girl herself, may be perceived as more traditional, conservative, sophisticated, strong, successful, perhaps even wealthy, than parents who chose a name like [name]Emerald[/name], [name]Dove[/name], or even [name]Butterfly[/name]. Does that make it a bad name? Maybe not, but still, maybe it does. I mentioned Western cultures because they tend to value names that, in a way, don’t need to be defended. It is fine to have an unusual name, as long as it is a name, if you know what I mean. Certainly, this doesn’t work everywhere, as every culture and country has unique naming practices, which is great!

I was merely saying that, in my own opinion, [name]Butterfly[/name] doesn’t convey the image I would want to give to my daughter, especially as she matures into a grown woman. [name]Butterfly[/name] certainly conveys flirty playfulness and childlike imagination, but it doesn’t convey a sense of strength, sophistication, and success that I would want for my daughter. Clearly, my opinion is not shared by everyone, and I wouldn’t make the mistake of assuming so.

If I met an adult named [name]Butterfly[/name] tomorrow I might prejudicially assume she had hippie parents. I might scoff or smirk. However, fourteen years from now [did she say her child was six?], when this kid is an adult, should I encounter a [name]Butterfly[/name] on the ballot, or the phone, I doubt I will think much of it other than to note her generation and be surprised she doesn’t have a last name as a first name, a unisex name, or some kind of [name]Emma[/name], [name]Ella[/name], [name]Ada[/name], [name]Ava[/name] variation. By the time little [name]Butterfly[/name] is an adult, the world will be propagated by much more controversial or “unique” names and our sensibilities will have adapted to it. We might find [name]Butterfly[/name] to be a perfectly sensible, grown-up name in a world where kids will probably be named after typos or texting acronyms.[/quote]

Oh, goodness, I personally hope not! I can’t see naming trends going that way, especially when, amidst the fascination with [name]Ava[/name] and [name]Ella[/name], [name]Ainsley[/name] and [name]Hailey[/name], more and more parents are returning to vintage names of the 1920s, reviving old classics, and making fresh naming choices with family names of their own.

If it suits her then it’s a good name. I don’t think it will be much of an issue, especially by the time she’s an adult. If anything, I think it will be a point of interest and will make her easier to remember.

On the one hand, it’s not what I would do, but on the other hand, I love when people go ahead and do what they want. It’s an interesting world that way, and I love meeting people with unusual names - I like to tend to think they have unusual parents and that their upbringing was unconventional and less inhibited than the norm.

This isn’t the only place I go on the internet - I have other interests, and one thing that maybe the lot of you might need to understand is that choosing an unusual name, er, how should I put this… a lot of the names we all put a lot of thought into, diverting from the usual, the classic, the ordinary, the popular, “real name” names, well, some people think that’s kind of icky. I’m not talking about [name]Butterfly[/name], I’m talking about other unusual and beautiful names that people think are classy and historical and grown-up. For some people, that’s altogether with [name]Kayley[/name] and [name]Haleigh[/name] and Jayzen - too weird, get over yourselves and stick with nice normal names (whatever that means, or whether that means being stuck in a rut, or does change with the times, but more slowly, I don’t know). I’m not saying that, and I get a little defensive with these people! Some people are never going to be aware that name Y is an authentic variation of name X, nor do they care, and think it’s pretentious. It’s just as if you’d said [name]Bronx[/name] [name]Mowgli[/name] 3 times, in a dark room at midnight, before a mirror. They don’t get it, and they think it’s showing off. I think it’s more of an intellectual delight in the dissection of language and the vibrations given off by a name, and then the person whose name it is. This is not a subject so many people give heaps of thought to, and probably why we get so many moms at odds with the preferences of their dudes. It just makes some people more uncomfortable to think about it, or to compromise, or to give in.

However, to bring this back around, so who are we and where are we sharing our thoughts and advice? [name]How[/name] far beyond [name]Jennifer[/name] and [name]Jason[/name], [name]Ava[/name] and [name]Aidan[/name], can we go? I think pretty far, if we want to. I may have some conservative tastes and I do feel a warning instinct to some names (or sometimes I just refrain from posting), but in the end, it’s great. That’s my ultimate opinion, no matter what I’ve ever said or what I might say in the future. I may not be ready for some names myself, I may wonder what the heck you’re thinking. But I cannot be all “ugh” about what people like and name their own children or try to form their choices for them, or hand them advice on what the future potential of their child is because they like an awful name. For one thing, most people don’t have awesome jobs, but nobody can’t get there if that’s what they want. Someone with a name is likely to be raised in an environment where they fit their name, and even if you try to tone it down or be conservative at the last minute, they are probably going to fit their upbringing, and not the serious professional career potential imparted by a conservative name.

Most of us have last names, not always easy to pronounce or spell, some attract more teasing than others, but something we cannot change (we can, but most people don’t - I mean married ladies too, well, that name you take and give to your children is not something you read in a list of names and chose for its quality). I don’t think it’s too awful to have to spell your name or have it mispronounced sometimes, or even to be teased a little. It’s how you learn to respond to teasing that determines how effective it is for other kids to tease you. Someone might tease you about your name, but likely they are teasing something else about you and using your name. So I don’t think there’s too much there. When you meet someone new, you learn their last name and it might be kind of silly, but you ignore that fact and don’t hold it against them, do you? So why be uptight about the first name? I’m sure I have been uptight to some people. My favorite names tend to be on the boring side, but I also have to say, I’m in favor of people who can dare, to do so, and not have too many doubts fed to them by people such as myself.

If I could give an honest opinion about the name [name]Butterfly[/name] - I don’t like bugs! So that wouldn’t be my choice. Butterflies are still insects. If I’m going to be more honest than that, I think I also don’t like birds. All of these creatures are interesting to observe in the wild and some are mighty beautiful, but I’m unlikely to choose a name of an animal that personally gives me the willies, even if it has other majestic qualities and etc. My take on nature names, I mostly prefer the geographic qualities of the mountains and valleys, the atmosphere, the sea (especially), outer space (somewhat), and for life, just life, or to pick out living things, some mammals and some plants. But I think [name]Butterfly[/name] is an awesome choice for your daughter. You loved it 6 years ago and you still love it, and she loves it. A good story.

This is what I meant. I don’t think choosing a name for your child is about pleasing anyone, really, well except for maybe yourself and your husband. It is about choosing a name that will suite your child and provide him or her a solid foundation and a good foot to start out on. I fully believe a name can do that. A name says a lot about a person (or that person’s parents) whether intended or not. For instance, parents who chose [name]Charlotte[/name] for their child, and the little girl herself, may be perceived as more traditional, conservative, sophisticated, strong, successful, perhaps even wealthy, than parents who chose a name like [name]Emerald[/name], [name]Dove[/name], or even [name]Butterfly[/name]. Does that make it a bad name? Maybe not, but still, maybe it does. I mentioned Western cultures because they tend to value names that, in a way, don’t need to be defended. It is fine to have an unusual name, as long as it is a name, if you know what I mean. Certainly, this doesn’t work everywhere, as every culture and country has unique naming practices, which is great!

I was merely saying that, in my own opinion, [name]Butterfly[/name] doesn’t convey the image I would want to give to my daughter, especially as she matures into a grown woman. [name]Butterfly[/name] certainly conveys flirty playfulness and childlike imagination, but it doesn’t convey a sense of strength, sophistication, and success that I would want for my daughter. Clearly, my opinion is not shared by everyone, and I wouldn’t make the mistake of assuming so.[/quote]

Your description of [name]Charlotte[/name] as “traditional, conservative, sophisticated, strong, successful, perhaps even wealthy” is very revealing. First of all, “traditional” and “conservative” are not connotations that are universally valued. Personally, those words translate to me as “boring” and “bland”. Since I value creativity and innovation, these are not virtues I would hope for in my kid and I would- out of kindness- try not to associate those horrible things with a kid or an adult named [name]Charlotte[/name], but I agree that there is that dusty safeness to the name. The other adjectives you mention are certainly seen as positive, but whether they truly apply to the name [name]Charlotte[/name] is debatable. Names are subjective.

Right now we have a president named [name]Barack[/name], so I think it’s safe to say that names that convey strength, wealth, power, and success today are not necessarily the same names that conveyed it yesterday. Or at least maybe there is more room at the podium now for unlikely newcomer names. [name]Charlotte[/name] is steeped in vintage charm, or yesterdayness. Perhaps it does convey all the things you mentioned, but that doesn’t mean [name]Butterfly[/name] doesn’t or can’t in the future. It’s not yesterday anymore. [name]Butterfly[/name] might be a writer for a successful television show, she might be a theater director, a dancer, a violinist. [name]Charlotte[/name] might answer phones, a very traditional and conservative position for a woman to hold. [name]Just[/name] what you want, right? I honestly don’t have a problem with the name [name]Charlotte[/name]. I’m just trying to give a different perspective.

If I met an adult named [name]Butterfly[/name] tomorrow I might prejudicially assume she had hippie parents. I might scoff or smirk. However, fourteen years from now [did she say her child was six?], when this kid is an adult, should I encounter a [name]Butterfly[/name] on the ballot, or the phone, I doubt I will think much of it other than to note her generation and be surprised she doesn’t have a last name as a first name, a unisex name, or some kind of [name]Emma[/name], [name]Ella[/name], [name]Ada[/name], [name]Ava[/name] variation. By the time little [name]Butterfly[/name] is an adult, the world will be propagated by much more controversial or “unique” names and our sensibilities will have adapted to it. We might find [name]Butterfly[/name] to be a perfectly sensible, grown-up name in a world where kids will probably be named after typos or texting acronyms.[/quote]

Oh, goodness, I personally hope not! I can’t see naming trends going that way, especially when, amidst the fascination with [name]Ava[/name] and [name]Ella[/name], [name]Ainsley[/name] and [name]Hailey[/name], more and more parents are returning to vintage names of the 1920s, reviving old classics, and making fresh naming choices with family names of their own.[/quote]

I just recently read an article by [name]Laura[/name] Wattenberg, author of the bestselling book “The [name]Baby[/name] Name [name]Wizard[/name]”, about the texting acronym “ilu” being used as a name. “Ilu” is of course a common sign-off that means “I love you”. [name]Laura[/name] predicts that teenie-boppers of today who live life through cell phone texts, IM, and social networking sites might be drawn to names that convey the here and now, the information age, the communication age. These future baby-making machines, might see Ilu as a sentimental yet fresh choice. [name]Even[/name] the men of tomorrow are born of the online gaming generation of today. Obscure techie references are bound to start popping up in the names of the future. Ilu actually fits right in with the vowel-heavy trend you mentioned. It’s not that far off from [name]Ella[/name], or even better, the fast-riser [name]Isla[/name]. I can’t find the article now, or I’d post a link. I don’t feel I’ve done it justice, but I have no doubt that internet lingo will find it’s way into our monikers.

This is what I meant. I don’t think choosing a name for your child is about pleasing anyone, really, well except for maybe yourself and your husband. It is about choosing a name that will suite your child and provide him or her a solid foundation and a good foot to start out on. I fully believe a name can do that. A name says a lot about a person (or that person’s parents) whether intended or not. For instance, parents who chose [name]Charlotte[/name] for their child, and the little girl herself, may be perceived as more traditional, conservative, sophisticated, strong, successful, perhaps even wealthy, than parents who chose a name like [name]Emerald[/name], [name]Dove[/name], or even [name]Butterfly[/name]. Does that make it a bad name? Maybe not, but still, maybe it does. I mentioned Western cultures because they tend to value names that, in a way, don’t need to be defended. It is fine to have an unusual name, as long as it is a name, if you know what I mean. Certainly, this doesn’t work everywhere, as every culture and country has unique naming practices, which is great!

I was merely saying that, in my own opinion, [name]Butterfly[/name] doesn’t convey the image I would want to give to my daughter, especially as she matures into a grown woman. [name]Butterfly[/name] certainly conveys flirty playfulness and childlike imagination, but it doesn’t convey a sense of strength, sophistication, and success that I would want for my daughter. Clearly, my opinion is not shared by everyone, and I wouldn’t make the mistake of assuming so.[/quote]

Your description of [name]Charlotte[/name] as “traditional, conservative, sophisticated, strong, successful, perhaps even wealthy” is very revealing. First of all, “traditional” and “conservative” are not connotations that are universally valued. Personally, those words translate to me as “boring” and “bland”. Since I value creativity and innovation, these are not virtues I would hope for in my kid and I would- out of kindness- try not to associate those horrible things with a kid or an adult named [name]Charlotte[/name], but I agree that there is that dusty safeness to the name. The other adjectives you mention are certainly seen as positive, but whether they truly apply to the name [name]Charlotte[/name] is debatable. Names are subjective.

Right now we have a president named [name]Barack[/name], so I think it’s safe to say that names that convey strength, wealth, power, and success today are not necessarily the same names that conveyed it yesterday. Or at least maybe there is more room at the podium now for unlikely newcomer names. [name]Charlotte[/name] is steeped in vintage charm, or yesterdayness. Perhaps it does convey all the things you mentioned, but that doesn’t mean [name]Butterfly[/name] doesn’t or can’t in the future. It’s not yesterday anymore. [name]Butterfly[/name] might be a writer for a successful television show, she might be a theater director, a dancer, a violinist. [name]Charlotte[/name] might answer phones, a very traditional and conservative position for a woman to hold. [name]Just[/name] what you want, right? I honestly don’t have a problem with the name [name]Charlotte[/name]. I’m just trying to give a different perspective.[/quote]

I didn’t say that those were universally valued characteristics. Everyone has their own opinions on names, which is what I thought this was about. I’m not casting judgment here, I’m merely expressing my opinion. Nowhere did I say that I hated the name [name]Butterfly[/name]. I don’t hate the name [name]Butterfly[/name] (even though I am, ironically, quite afraid of the creatures) - I merely said it wasn’t my style and I would’ve made a different choice. PEOPLE value different things in names, which is why we have so many different ones - a good thing!

“[name]Charlotte[/name] might answer phones, a very traditional and conservative position for a woman to hold. [name]Just[/name] what you want, right?” I don’t know what this means or what you are trying to suggest with this comment, and I don’t really think I want to know. This sounds like a very sexist comment, reflective of the ideologies and expectations surrounding women at the turn of the 20th century, spanning well into today, even. This is not a view I subscribe to, however, and I certainly didn’t think I conveyed that in my earlier post. I happen to like the name [name]Charlotte[/name] quite a bit, and of course that reflects on my naming style - I like classics. Yes, some people think they are stuffy and boring, but I think they are elegant and pretty. If you don’t care for it (though I realize you don’t have a “problem” with it) it is quite alright with me!

I think that perhaps my words are being misconstrued, but you can think what you want. I respect your opinion as much as I respect anyone else’s, as individuality and self-expression is also something I value, like you. I’ll leave my comments on this poll at that, as I don’t want to feel like I need to stand up for myself on this poll. I wish you a good night!

[name]Lemon[/name]:

We’re just discussing personal opinions, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be looked at objectively. Examining the reasoning behind our likes and dislikes as individuals and as a society is interesting. I think that’s why we as name enthusiasts/critics participate in discussions like this. Maybe I’m a little too enthusiastic/critical. I’ll give you that if I’ve offended you, but I’d like to stress that it’s all just for argument’s sake on my end. I like/dislike [name]Butterfly[/name] and [name]Charlotte[/name] equally. It’s just that [name]Charlotte[/name] doesn’t need any defending as a name, whereas I think [name]Butterfly[/name] could use some.

For clarity’s sake-- since you don’t want to know-- my “[name]Charlotte[/name] might answer phones” comment was very much meant to remind you of the expectations of women around the turn of the 20th century. I thought that was obvious. When you choose a classic name you get all of the tradition and conservatism that comes with it. As you seemed to take for granted that traditionalism and conservatism are good things, I thought I might point out that they can just as easily be bad. Sexism, for instance, is a tradition. As a name [name]Butterfly[/name] has it’s own obvious drawbacks to overcome. I just don’t think they’re really any worse than a lot of cherished classics or new, trendy inductees. Since there’s safety in numbers, the baggage in these names gets overlooked while standouts get eyed suspiciously. It’s silly. There might be greater risk in a name like [name]Butterfly[/name] [maybe!], but there’s no guarantee that playing it safe is really gonna render your kid happier or more successful either. Safety can be damning-- or just plain… plain.

And a good night to you as well, [name]Lemon[/name].

About the texting acronym post…

The name was Ily, not Ilu. I was mistaken. [name]Both[/name] stand for “I love you”. Here’s the blog address if anyone is interested:

http://www.babynamewizard.com/archives/2009/9/the-name-of-the-future

All of you’ve got a point. On one hand, there’s [name]Butterfly[/name] Annesly (did I spell it right?), a girl who may or may not choose Annesly for her name when she’s older. On the other hand, [name]Butterfly[/name] is light-hearted and welcoming even when smirked at. On the other other hand (lots of hands, right?!) [name]Butterfly[/name] would be the best name there is in the next generations to come, where kids could indeed be named after typos. It’s very true that any of this could happen, but we’ll never know till she grows up, you know? Maybe there will be another name for her to choose - maybe she’ll mix [name]Butterfly[/name] and Annesly together into something strange and exotic. My friend name [name]Cecilia[/name] is called [name]Celie[/name], for no reason. And [name]ButterFLY[/name] and AnneSLY are the same, other than the F and the S being different. I mean, anything could happen, right?

As [name]Butterfly[/name] is being homeschooled and living in [name]Africa[/name], I don’t think anyone until she’s old enough to go to college maybe would actually laugh at her name behind her back. I [name]LOVE[/name] the name [name]Butterfly[/name], I actually have an old American doll named [name]Butterfly[/name] and I’ve always wanted to be named [name]Butterfly[/name]. Well, it was either [name]Butterfly[/name] or [name]Buttercup[/name]. But of course you probably couldn’t name someone [name]Buttercup[/name]. . . .

[name]Butterfly[/name] is creative, welcomed in my realm of life, and I could actually use that for one of my characters (I’m an author, but I haven’t published any books yet). Oh, and what is the name of your first child?

If you have any other children, name them something jungly, like [name]Butterfly[/name], only not [name]Butterfly[/name], seeing as you already have a child named [name]Butterfly[/name]. . . . :slight_smile: Anyways, good luck!

(If [name]Butterfly[/name] calls you when she’s eighteen and she’s crying, you’ll know that her name is probably being teased too harshly. I had a friend whose name was [name]Skyler[/name]-[name]Hope[/name] and she was laughed at too. Sorry, but you can suggest to her to use Annesly, you know.)

I wonder why you wrote in to get our opinions about your daughter’s name, when you daughter is now 6 (??) years old. (I think that’s right.) What motivated you to open yourself up to compliments and criticism about a name that is well established? I haven’t read all of the posts on this thread, but I would say, if you like the name, and your daughter likes her name, that is what is really important at this point.

At the time of your daughter’s birth, you say your dad was so embarrassed and/or uncomfortable with the name that he was unable to say it to his colleagues. Well, I am happy to hear that he has grown more comfortable with the name. I suppose he really had no choice. I know of a similar situation – some grandparents with a granddaughter named [name]Precious[/name]. They were extremely uncomfortable with her name, and tried to get their daughter to choose another name. No luck. So, while I believe they still don’t favor the name, they have no choice but to go with it.

However, if I am ever in a situation where my parents or in-laws would so abhor a name I chose for their grandchild that they could barely bring themselves to say it, I don’t think I would put them through that. I think if my family hated my name choice to that extreme, I would choose another name. It’s really the level of abhoring a name I am talking about. If they simply didn’t like the name, but were not filled with angst every time they said it to a friend or colleague, I would still go with it. But I am not ‘out to get them’ through my naming choices. Perhaps you were (just a little bit), and giving your dad a little bit of a hard time gave you some small glee. Nothing so terrible in that, if it’s true, which it might not be. Anyway, just a thought.

Best wishes.

I haven’t read the other posts, but I just thought I’d give my opinion.

My personal worry about [name]Butterfly[/name], and the reason I wouldn’t use it, is that I would be worried how well it would age, and the awkward nn (Butt?). However, it has a lovely sound, and such a wonderful association. Well done for going with what you wanted, and she can always use [name]Annsley[/name] ([name]Annie[/name] would be cute) if she finds she wants a more traditional name as she gets older.

[name]May[/name] I enquire as to what your first daughter’s name is?

i’m a fan of unusal names…
i work in a professional environment and i encountered a woman the other day who was named [name]Merry[/name] [name]Nicole[/name] [name]Christmas[/name]… no lie…
I had to ask how it was growing up with a name like that… she said that it had been hard on her in school, she got teased a bit… but she hadn’t been otherwise affected. i think pretty much all kids get teased about their names at one point or another…
i grew up with Calissandrina… i [name]LOVE[/name] my name.
it’s unusual… unique… people always ask about it when they see my card and i love telling the story of how my parents picked my name…
the point is… little [name]Butterfly[/name] [name]Annsley[/name] loves her name. it suits her. all it’s going to do in the future is give her an interesting topic to discuss… and make her easy to remember.
when she applies for that job… you know the interviewer is goign to remember the bright, effervescent, cheerful girl named [name]Butterfly[/name]…
personally… i [name]LOVE[/name] the name you picked…
but then again, i’m a fan of unusal names…

I too immediately wondered why you’re asking for commentary on the name you gave your daughter six years ago. If this were a poll, I would definitely vote in the negative. I don’t think [name]Butterfly[/name] is a suitable given name. It would make a cute nickname within a family (just as one of my daughters wanted to be called “Kitten” when she was young), but I can’t think of any respectable professions where the name [name]Butterfly[/name] would be an asset. And as another poster remarked, there really isn’t any nn for [name]Butterfly[/name] that would improve the situation. I’m glad your little girl likes her name, although since she’s not out among other children she may not realize what an unusual name it is. I’m afraid that if she were in school, she would hear comments and jokes about her name on a daily basis. Still this is her name, so it’s important that she feels positive about it and continues to do so.