Mae sound with more than one syllable

I like the name [name]Mae[/name]/[name]May[/name]- but hopeing to find a 2 or 3 syllable name that has the [name]Mae[/name] sound in it. Are there any names with a [name]Mae[/name] sound at the end? Thanks!

[name]Mabel[/name] and [name]Mavis[/name] are two of my favorite names.

Others:

[name]Esme[/name]
[name]Macy[/name]
[name]Maren[/name] (prn [name]Mare[/name]-in)

[name]Maeva[/name] and [name]Magen[/name] are the only two that come to mind other than [name]Mabel[/name] and [name]Mavis[/name], as the pp suggested.

I’ve seen Jessamay (not [name]Jessa[/name]-[name]May[/name]) as a variant of [name]Jessamy[/name] or [name]Jessamine[/name]. I don’t know if it’s considered legit, but it’s pretty. Slightly more daring, but in the same vein as [name]Esme[/name] (or [name]Esmay[/name], as you will) is [name]Salome[/name].

[name]Annamae[/name]
[name]Ellamae[/name]

or at the beginning
Mayfair
[name]Maybelle[/name]
Maylee
[name]Maeve[/name]
Maelia

or:
Lamaea
[name]Amaya[/name]
Tamaya

Maebri
[name]Maeva[/name]
Maelyn

I recommend making it a double-barrel first name. I know an elderly woman named [name]Anna[/name] [name]Mae[/name]–perfect for her, but I don’t recommend it because of today’s “anime” cartoons. However, I know an Amish woman named [name]Sadie[/name] [name]Mae[/name]. You can really put any two-syllable name with [name]Mae[/name] to make it an awesome double-barrel first name, and it doesn’t seem to be a problem getting people to call her the whole thing all the time, at least not with my grandma and [name]Sadie[/name] [name]Mae[/name]. Ideas:

[name]Nella[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Katie[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Sophie[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Cilla[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Maggie[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Ella[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Ada[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]
[name]Macy[/name]-[name]Mae[/name]

I like [name]Maybelle[/name] and [name]Maple[/name].

Or I’d use it as a MN, [name]Ivy[/name] [name]Mae[/name], [name]Ruby[/name] [name]Mae[/name], etc. but I wouldn’t hyphenate it, I’d just always use both together.