Naming restrictions

[name_m]Hi[/name_m] there!
I wanna ask you, what do you think about countries where the naming restrictions are very strict (in. ex. Iceland I guess).
I can’t tell for sure but I guess there were many of that kinda restrictions in my country some years ago – in. ex. that you can’t give your child a foreign name or spelling, or that EVERY feminine name has to end with ‘a’ maybe except one or two in the whole country (that restriction would be so horrible, imagine how many names would be forbidden!)…
If I’d choose a foreign one while not having a foreign background from any side of the family, I don’t know if people would accept that.
Also if you visit my country, I guess you could think that a vast majority of certain age groups bears only names from top 15, maybe 20. If I had to tell, which names seem unique here, I guess I’d say they start to seem original below the top 15 or 20?
How does it work in your country?

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In my country you can call your child whatever. Except for names like [name_m]Adolf[/name_m] really.
I’m in UK.

Eta: @ethelmary or @katkabet or someone who is a regular i guess this might need moving to baby names?

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Sorry for a wrong category!

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Thanks for mentioning, I moved it

In my country, the rule was “should make sense with the Turkish phonetics” until 2006, but they didn’t really care. I’ve never heard about a name getting rejected. Now the rule is completely removed, no restrictions about names.

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Where I’m from technically you can name your kid whatever you want I believe? However, 99% of people of Greek background use Saints’ names for their kids, because in the Orthodox church in Greece your kid can’t get baptized without having an orthodox name and most adults here are religious. Therefore you’ll never see a, for example, just [name_f]Kate[/name_f], i will always be Aikaterina ‘‘[name_f]Kate[/name_f]’’ because it has to be a [name_m]Saint[/name_m]’s name.

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It doesn’t matter its just that you’ll get better response here

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I think in the UK you can legally name your child pretty much anything. There’s definitely no restrictions on foreign or invented names. It’s extremely rare for the authorities to refuse to put a name on a birth certificate. The only time I’ve ever heard of that happening was when a woman with a mental illness wanted to name her baby “Cyanide”.

I heard of a baby in the news who has [name_m]Adolf[/name_m] as a middle name (the child of [name_u]Neo[/name_u]-Nazi parents, unfortunately for him).

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As @Lilsibubs said, in the UK pretty much most names are fine, obviously as long as they don’t harm the child.

But I know from friends in [name_u]Germany[/name_u] that rules are stricter there.
A baby’s name must be identifiable with one gender, and names aren’t allowed to be made up. Also no place or word names usually, I think.

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I don’t think there are any illegal names in my country, but you probably can’t name your child Tablet or WiFi or Butthole. However, I knew a kid named [name_m]Wood[/name_m], and nobody stopped his parents 🤷

Im in the US and there aren’t really any restrictions. Woooo paaarty!!

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I’m also in the US. Though there aren’t many naming restrictions, the biggest one I can think of is what characters can be used. On the general whole, letters, hyphens and apostrophes are what can be used… numbers are only accepted when writing out suffixes (Sr, [name_m]Jr[/name_m], III, etc) and they are usually in the form of roman numerals anyway. Hyphens and apostrophes aren’t always included… it’s often to the discretion of whomever is entering the data. [name_m]Even[/name_m] if you can get them on the birth certificate, many other government related records can leave them out. With this issue, many people can have multiple accounts (one with hyphen, one without, one with the hyphenated made into one name, etc).

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In Finland we have pretty strict naming laws. At least you can’t give your child a name which can’t be pronounced in Finnish and you can’t give a boy a girl name or the other way around.

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iceland has a whole bunch of interesting naming restrictions! i’m not icelandic so perhaps i’m not the best person to speak on it, but they really limit what names and characters you can use because they must fit into the grammatical structure of the language. this story i recently read was particularly intriguing! can you imagine just being called “girl” your whole life because the government won’t recognize your name?

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