What are your thoughts on Dixie?

Hey! I’m a little curious on your thoughts on [name_f]Dixie[/name_f]! [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] is my grandfathers name (yes I repeat, GRANDFATHERS name) and I’m not a huge fan of it :sweat_smile: I think of it as a country name and I’m not into country at all. I also don’t like it because of its reference to slavery and white privilege and me, not being into social media I also don’t like it because of [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] D’Amelio (I probably just offended some country people and TikTok lovers. Apologies for that! :sweat_smile: )

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I agree with everything you just said lol. Very much gives off country vibes/slavery and I thought of [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] D’Amelio when I first read it. Overall, the negative connotations definitely weigh out positive connotations (if people have them).

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Agreed, for all the reasons you mentioned, it’s probably not usable. What about [name_f]Trixie[/name_f]?

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Cute name, but I definitely wouldn’t use it because of the slavery stuff. What about [name_u]Darcy[/name_u] instead?

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Darcy is cute!

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I actually won’t be surprised if it starts getting popular because of [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] D’Amelio. But, I feel like people should be warned of the negative things [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] has been associated with

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I don’t like the nickname [name_m]Dix[/name_m] because well yeah lol

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Someone that I spent plenty of time around growing up was named [name_f]Dixie[/name_f]. She was the least country person I know. She carried the name beautifully. Due to her, I have always separated the name from all other references related to the name.

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I think most who use the name know the negative aspects, but they have an overwhelming personal pro list for using the name.

BTW I don’t know who this YouTuber is, so they have non bearing on me.

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The “dick” part is a no go for me. But how sad that we still ignorantly associate Dixie with slavery, as though slavery was a uniquely Southern phenomenon.

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I do think the critique of it being “too country” is unproductive, but [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] does have historical ties to slavery that make it problematic to use today.

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As an American, I think it’s too strongly tied to slavery and a white supremacist model of [name_u]Southern[/name_u] pride to be appealing.

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^^agreed on both counts. @cactusgram’s idea of [name_f]Trixie[/name_f] would be a fun, spunky alternative!

Hmm. I associate [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] specifically with the Confederacy, which was explicitly and uniquely tied to slavery. That’s not to say that the rest of the country didn’t participate in slavery or that white supremacy isn’t structurally ingrained in every region of the country to this day–on the contrary, it absolutely did and it absolutely is. But from my understanding, [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] itself has blatant ties to the defense of slavery.

I am definitely not an expert on this issue! But based on my current understanding of these associations, I wouldn’t use the name.

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To me [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] just doesn’t seem advisable. It has obvious teasing potential in the first syllable, and problematic associations because of its connection to the Confederacy.

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I agree with all of your reasoning. Some similar names could be [name_f]Trixie[/name_f], [name_f]Roxie[/name_f], or [name_f]Daisy[/name_f]

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It reminds me of [name_f]Pixie[/name_f], which then reminds me of Pixy Stix, which then reminds me of something I read where Pixy Stix’ were being infused with drugs :upside_down_face:
I personally don’t find it all that usable, sorry!

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Wow [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] on a guy? Interesting. Ok so I’m from the south and living in the south, though I’m really from a small/medium sized city, not the “country.” I think [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] is a cute name for a girl, actually. I had an older, distant relative with the name and I think it’s totally spunky and cute! [name_m]Don[/name_m]’t know anything about the social media person. Would I personally name someone [name_f]Dixie[/name_f]? No. Honestly I’d be afraid of being labeled racist and white trash. [name_m]Even[/name_m] though I don’t think any of that is fair or right.

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Yep [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] can be used on a boy apparently. For some background info, my great-grandparents named him that because the doctor who was helping with the birthing process was named [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] (keep in mind, he was also a guy) so they named my grandfather that. I also agree that being defined as “racist” and “white trash” isn’t quite fair if you are neither of those.

Dixie kind of reminds me of my childhood where we had to sing [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] every day in school (oh I wish I was in [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] away away in Dixieland I’ll take my stand to live and die in [name_f]Dixie[/name_f]) and the book Because of [name_u]Winn[/name_u] [name_f]Dixie[/name_f].
I don’t know how well it would work now because of the ties to the confederacy - though the TikToker might add some appeal.
[name_f]Trixie[/name_f] is a good suggestion, if you are looking for suggestions

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Hiya! The song “[name_f]Dixie[/name_f]” (where the term comes from in this context) originated as part of minstrel shows, which involved blackface and mockery of black people in general. Not to mention, it was widely considered the Confederate anthem, which makes it a notably negative association to have.

This is the Britannica Encyclopedia article that defines [name_f]Dixie[/name_f] as being explicitly tied to minstrel shows and the Confederacy. So while I would not immediately assume someone is racist for using this name, the ties run very deep.

Also [name_m]Dix[/name_m] is the first syllable. I definitely second the suggestion of [name_u]Darcy[/name_u]! So cute and similar enough I think for the honor to be felt. :slight_smile:

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