Why not "just" Minnie?

My goal with names like [name_f]Minerva[/name_f] and more recently [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f] is to get the nickname [name_f]Minnie[/name_f].

If the purpose of the longer, more formal name is to use a nickname, is there a purpose for the longer name? A part of me says yes, because it will be better accepted and respected in mainstream society. Then a part of me says no, because what we really want is the nickname-name to use it on a regular basis. This is also considering we will not use middle names.

What do you say?

Personally, I tend to like full names. However, I think [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] is pretty well established as a name and it doesn’t feel super ‘cutesy’ or hard to wear as an adult.

I’m in the US, where nickname-names aren’t as popular as in [name_f]England[/name_f] (not sure where you are). However, I know an adult [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] who uses it in her professional business life with no issues. I think if you don’t love [name_f]Minerva[/name_f] or [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f], but do love [name_f]Minnie[/name_f], you should use [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] on its own. If you love [name_f]Minerva[/name_f] or [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f] as much as just [name_f]Minnie[/name_f], then I would use a full name.

I hope this makes sense!

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It does, for sure. Thank you :sunflower:.

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Hmm. If I like the long form of a name, I would rather use it because it seems more complete and you can choose to use a nickname. However, I wouldn’t use a full name I didn’t like or use a long name if I plan on ONLY using a nickname.

Non-established nickname names can be difficult to wear because everyone will assume it’s short for something (and ask). I would also avoid any nickname name that wouldn’t be taken seriously or seen as professional (although I think lots of names can work; very few are truly difficult to wear in a modern workplace). Some nicknames might feel too affectionate to be called by a stranger.

However, I absolutely understand that nickname names are what a lot of people want their kids to go by, and I respect that! If you like [name_f]Minnie[/name_f], go with [name_f]Minnie[/name_f].

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I don’t really like [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] and it has a strong association with [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] Mouse, which makes it seem overly cutesy and childish. But, as EagleEyes pointed out, none of that means that it couldn’t work perfectly well for an adult woman. A name does not make someone a professional or not, the person does.

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I personally prefer full names, but I wouldn’t use a name I don’t love just for its nickname.

It actually depends on the nickname too. [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] is well-established as a stand alone, so are [name_f]Annie[/name_f], [name_f]Nell[/name_f] etc. But something like [name_f]Birdie[/name_f] or [name_f]Dottie[/name_f] might get different reactions from people.

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I am personally of the mindset that usually, a longer and more professional name can really come in handy. But I agree with PP that you shouldn’t use a name you hate just to get to a nickname you like. I also feel like female names have a tendency to be flimsy and inconsequential, and I have a strong preference for names with some weight or gravitas or strength behind them. [name_f]Minnie[/name_f], while lovely and sweet and adorable, is too cutesy on its own for me to personally ever use – it falls into that category with [name_f]Daisy[/name_f] and [name_f]Maisie[/name_f] and [name_f]Honey[/name_f] and [name_f]Lola[/name_f] for me. I do love it as a nickname though! And some people may totally disagree with that and that’s fine!

FWIW, I struggle with this with names I like too – I love [name_f]Pippa[/name_f], but do not like [name_f]Philippa[/name_f], and have tried to think about so many names that could get me to that nickname and have come up short of finding one I love. And I just don’t feel like [name_f]Pippa[/name_f] has enough weight to stand on its own.

What about [name_f]Imogen[/name_f] as a full name? [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] is kind of a stretch nickname, but I think it could maybe work.

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FWIW, I’ve known both an adult [name_f]Barbie[/name_f] and an adult [name_f]Bambi[/name_f] who worked serious, professional jobs (business and law) without issue. Kids were far more likely to comment on it that adults.

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See, this is interesting, because I don’t want to use flimsy, inconsequential names for my son or daughter. However, to me it’s the history of the name what gives them character and makes them inspiring, rather than any random name. I like [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] because it was the name of [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] Hollow [name_m]Wood[/name_m], who fought the US Cavalry and defended our People, although that role was taken mostly by men. To me she’s a legend, and her name is full of courage because she was like that. [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f] and [name_f]Minerva[/name_f] might look stronger because they’re longer, but they have nothing on [name_f]Minnie[/name_f].

I personally tend to like full names with nicknames, but that doesn’t mean nickname names aren’t acceptable, too!

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As a [name_u]Brit[/name_u], nicknames are the go-to here. I’ve met a [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] (that was her full name) and she wore it well. I’ve also met a [name_f]Mina[/name_f] which i think is sweet too. If you like [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f] and [name_f]Minerva[/name_f] then i think go with those. But honestly if you don’t LOVE them and are only using them to get [name_f]Minnie[/name_f], i would say just go with [name_f]Minnie[/name_f]. It’s sweet but not overly cutesy.

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I like full names but not because I think they are necessarily needed (there’s nothing wrong with [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] as a name on its own), I just like the idea of giving a child multiple options.

Now with certain names that could have more than one nn option and some that you don’t like, I think it makes more sense to just use the nn you like as a name.

For instance, if you didn’t like the potential nn [name_f]Willa[/name_f] or [name_f]Mina[/name_f] I wouldn’t use [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f] unless you just loved the name. If you only love it for [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] then just use [name_f]Minnie[/name_f].
[name_f]Minerva[/name_f] is harder to get any other nicknames from so [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] would be more of a default nn probably.

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I like full names with NN potential. [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] might not have an issue professionally but as a kid the ridicule could be damaging. How about [name_f]Elmina[/name_f]?

I think [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] works perfectly on its own.

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Then go for it!! I think personal associations matter a great deal when deciding how you feel about a name. If you love the story behind [name_f]Minnie[/name_f]’s name, that’s all that matters!

I don’t think that longer = stronger or anything like that, to be clear – more just names ending in “ie” come across as cutesy, and [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] Mouse is the first thing that comes to mind when I hear [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] as PP said. But that’s my personal bias, and shouldn’t affect how you feel or what you decide! :slight_smile:

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I think [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] would work on it’s own. I’m a big fan of ‘nicknamey’ names

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Naming her [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] with mean that everyone will call her [name_f]Minnie[/name_f], not a longer form that you don’t love. It also means that others won’t call her [name_f]Willa[/name_f] or [name_u]Nev[/name_u], or any other nickname that you don’t necessarily want to name your child. Putting [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] on her birth certificate will take out that ambiguity (especially since [name_f]Wilhelmina[/name_f] is incredibly nickname rich).

Nickname rich names can be great if you love both the longer form, and one (or hopefully a couple) nicknames for the name. But that doesn’t seem like to be the case for you.

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I don’t know many [name_f]Minnie[/name_f]’s probably because of [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] Mouse but -ie names are completely normal in the U.K. - [name_f]Millie[/name_f], [name_f]Edie[/name_f], [name_f]Evie[/name_f], [name_f]Rosie[/name_f], [name_f]Katie[/name_f], [name_f]Hettie[/name_f], [name_f]Bonnie[/name_f], [name_u]Bobbie[/name_u], [name_u]Billie[/name_u], [name_f]Lizzie[/name_f], [name_f]Lottie[/name_f], [name_f]Dottie[/name_f], [name_f]Hattie[/name_f]. [name_f]Lettie[/name_f], [name_f]Ellie[/name_f], [name_f]Tillie[/name_f] etc.

I do know a girl called [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] in her 20s and in the US you’ve got [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] [name_m]Driver[/name_m]. I think it’s well known enough to work

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I prefer having a full name (there are some exceptions), but if you love “just [name_f]Minnie[/name_f],” then go for it!

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This is something I struggle with too! I love nickname-names, but I never quite love any of the fullname versions as much, and I know that I would only ever use the nn.
I wish society didnt judge people based on their names so much! Whos to say whats ‘professional’ and whats not?
I’d just use the name I truly love, and I think [name_f]Minnie[/name_f] is perfect all on its own.

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