How common is Emma, really?

[name_u]West[/name_u] [name_u]Coast[/name_u] US checking in. [name_f]Emma[/name_f] is extremely common here, even my tiny high school had multiple Emma’s in the class and it hasn’t gotten less popular since. I don’t personally know any little kids named [name_f]Emma[/name_f], but I also just don’t know many children in general (I don’t have kids and neither do any of my friends).

Unfortunately I do agree with others that this is one of those names that is exactly as ubiquitous and common as the statistics suggest.

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Thank you! This is what I was thinking too.

Where I live ( in Germany) [name_f]Emma[/name_f] has been in the top 10 most popular first names for several years. Despite this, I never had an [name_f]Emma[/name_f] in my class in my entire school journey and there were none in my parallel classes. [name_f]My[/name_f] conclusion: [name_f]Emma[/name_f] is a beautiful classic first name. It is popular but not overused. If I were in your place I would use it.
PS: And if so: Personally, I loved meeting children with the same name as me when I was growing up so It doesn’t necessarily have be a bad thing.
Go for it!

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I am in [name_f]Canada[/name_f], west coast. I have never met an [name_f]Emma[/name_f] or heard of someone having a baby [name_f]Emma[/name_f]. If you love it - use it!

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[name_m]Hi[/name_m] there.

[name_f]Emma[/name_f] really is a great name. I’m in the Midwest as well, & I hear it all of the time in real life. Mostly on school aged kids. Basically every other girl is [name_f]Addie[/name_f], [name_f]Evie[/name_f] or [name_u]Avery[/name_u], but there are a good lot of Emmas too. Oh, and I totally hear [name_f]Nora[/name_f] way more than other Berries seem too. Maybe we’re in the same city! All of this being said, I’d still go for [name_f]Emma[/name_f] if it’s your one true love. It’s way popular, but it’s not trendy. It’s a timeless vintage sounding classic.

[name_f]Hope[/name_f] this helps. :slight_smile:

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In the Southeast US here, and [name_f]Emma[/name_f] does feel extremely common to me, but in a way that might eventually feel “classic.” I’ve seen it on people of all ages, but more recently, teenagers and younger. It does come to mind when I think of popular names, if I’m perfectly honest. However! I believe if you really truly love a name, you should use it!

If popularity is a major worry, it would fit perfectly fine as a middle, and there’s plenty of names that could lead to [name_f]Emma[/name_f] as a nickname.

[name_f]Emmeline[/name_f]
[name_f]Emelina[/name_f]
[name_f]Emmanuelle[/name_f]
[name_f]Emerald[/name_f] / [name_f]Emeralda[/name_f]

[name_u]An[/name_u] “Em” first with an “A” middle could work too!

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I live in Central [name_f]Canada[/name_f] and [name_f]Emma[/name_f] was very popular the year I was born. It was almost my sister’s name, before a friend of my mom’s used it first. In high school there were at least 12 Emma’s in my graduating class alone. However they are all in their 20’s now, I haven’t heard it nearly as much on the young kids that I’ve worked with the past couple of years.
[name_f]Emma[/name_f] is a classic name, that I don’t think will ever really suffer from feeling dated. Plus if you were to choose a more unique middle name, rather than a filler like Rose/Marie/Grace/etc, that would also help to distinguish the name. If you love [name_f]Emma[/name_f], I would definitely say you should use it!

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[name_f]Emma[/name_f] is quite popular. But it also sounds like there’s no name you love as much as [name_f]Emma[/name_f], so I’d hesitate to tell you to go another direction! No one name is quite as popular as most names where when you and your husband were growing up.

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I’m from the Western US and I’ve only met two people named [name_f]Emma[/name_f] (ages 16 and 12). I have seen the name pop up somewhat frequently, but based on my experience, it definitely isn’t in the top 5 names I’ve heard, or maybe even top 10 - I hear [name_f]Ella[/name_f] and [name_f]Elizabeth[/name_f] a lot more. I also agree with previous posts; it seems like [name_f]Emma[/name_f] is the name your heart loves, and I would listen to your heart :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

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I’m in the UK and it is mega common here. I know dozens!

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UK. And very.

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Thank you!! This does help. Haha, I wonder if we are in the same city!! I also hear Addie/Maddie, Nora/Cora, and Evelyn/Everly a ton! I have a good friend in my city who has taught 3-year-old preschool for seven years and has never had an [name_f]Emma[/name_f]!

Thank you everyone for your insight! It is fascinating how different our experiences are! :relaxed:

I’m from the [name_u]Southern[/name_u] US, and I have met quite a few Emmas over the last 10 years or so. However, I still love the name! A young [name_f]Emma[/name_f] would likely meet many others with her name. However, I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. She might even like sharing her name with others. If you love the name and you feel like it suits your daughter upon meeting her, I wouldn’t let popularity stop you.

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I only know 1 [name_f]Emma[/name_f] and she doesn’t even live in the US and [name_f]Emma[/name_f] is a beautiful name I would go for it!! (PS [name_f]Emma[/name_f] was in the running for my name and my parents thought it was too popular so it’s not actually my name but they still love it)

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This is mind blowing, but also your sign to use [name_f]Emma[/name_f]! [name_m]Just[/name_m] know that you’ll probably run into others, but as long as you’re ok with that, I say go for it.

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There were several girls named [name_f]Emma[/name_f] when I was in school, they’d be mid-30s now. But I don’t know of any that are babies or toddlers now (lots named [name_f]Olivia[/name_f] though!) Same with Emily–they’d all be older now–and only one of each [name_f]Sophia[/name_f] and Sofia… so it depends. I’m surprised I haven’t met any little Emmas since I keep seeing how it’s popular. [name_f]My[/name_f] advice would be though, if you love [name_f]Emma[/name_f], always have and always will, to use it. If it’s popular, it’s popular for a reason. Two of my kids have names that are on the rise and I’m still so glad I used them. I take it as a compliment that others have similar taste. I don’t think we’ll see another [name_f]Jennifer[/name_f] situation like before, there are just so many names to play with now. So go with your heart!

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I love [name_f]Emma[/name_f] too but I also don’t want my daughter to have an overly common name (although I have learned that because there are so many more names used now, statically you’d never have a [name_f]Jennifer[/name_f] or [name_f]Megan[/name_f] situation even with [name_f]Emma[/name_f], [name_f]Olivia[/name_f] and Amelia). We are actually going with [name_f]Emmeline[/name_f] (pn Emmeh-leen) nn [name_f]Emmie[/name_f] or [name_f]Emma[/name_f] depending on what she prefers. I think in the US however, it would be more likely pronounced Emma-LINE. That could be another consideration, [name_f]Emmeline[/name_f] or [name_f]Emmaline[/name_f].

I’m in the PNW and I know three little Emmas- a 6yo, 3yo and 1yo. As others said, it depends on your circle- I also know 3 baby Lila’s and that name is barely in the top 100. I think your little [name_f]Emma[/name_f] would meet lots of other Emma’s, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Many of the most successful, confident people I know have incredibly common names like [name_m]Matt[/name_m] or [name_f]Sarah[/name_f] and it doesn’t seem to slow them down any;)

I do agree you may want to give her a middle name she could also choose to go by. [name_m]Case[/name_m] in point: my name is [name_f]Julia[/name_f] but my family always called me [name_u]Julie[/name_u]. [name_f]My[/name_f] husband’s sister and cousin are also named [name_u]Julie[/name_u]. I’m not sure the marriage would’ve worked out if I didn’t have the option to go by Julia;)

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If you like it, use it.

I work with kids and right now I have a lot of littles that are [name_u]Emory[/name_u], [name_f]Emilia[/name_f], and Emma-hyphen-Something (usually one syllable). The not-Emmas often go by [name_f]Emma[/name_f]. And the Emma-hyphens use both names if there’s more than 1 and just [name_f]Emma[/name_f] if they’re the only ones in the group.

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