Teddy? Is this a NN from Edward or Theodore?

What do you guys think? How do you even get [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] from the above names hah?

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I think it can be a nicknane for both:)

Apparently this is where it comes from:

“The name [name_m]Ted[/name_m] is yet another result of the Old [name_f]English[/name_f] tradition of letter swapping. Since there were a limited number of first names in the Middle Ages, letter swapping allowed people to differentiate between people with the same name. It was common to replace the first letter of a name that began with a vowel, as in [name_m]Edward[/name_m], with an easier to pronounce consonant, such as T. Of course, [name_m]Ted[/name_m] was already a popular nickname for [name_m]Theodore[/name_m], which makes it one of the only nicknames derived from two different first names.”

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It can be a nickname from both!

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I know [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] as a nn for [name_m]Theodore[/name_m], but I can see it as both.

I believe it’s used as a nickname for both.

I remember reading that in the past, “Th” would have been pronounced as “T” (this old pronunciation is preserved in some modern names like [name_m]Thomas[/name_m], [name_f]Theresa[/name_f] and [name_f]Esther[/name_f]). That could possibly explain how [name_m]Ted[/name_m] came from [name_m]Theodore[/name_m].

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Theodore --> [name_m]Ted[/name_m] --> [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] (Idk, [name_f]Meg[/name_f]/Maggie come from [name_f]Margaret[/name_f], so [name_m]Ted[/name_m]/Teddy can come from [name_m]Theodore[/name_m].)

Edward, though… I’ve always heard of [name_m]Ed[/name_m]/Eddy/Ned as the more intuitive nicknames for [name_m]Edward[/name_m], but there’s no N in it either, so if [name_m]Ned[/name_m] works, why not [name_m]Ted[/name_m]/Teddy?

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While [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] is a traditional nickname for [name_m]Edward[/name_m] I just can’t hear/see it.

Theodore makes sense though. Theodore.

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I can’t really see it either. [name_m]Theodore[/name_m] makes way more sense to me. :woman_shrugging:t3:

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Only Teddys I know in real life had given names of [name_m]Edward[/name_m] and [name_m]Edwin[/name_m]. I think it works for any of the [name_m]Ed[/name_m] names.

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I know that [name_m]Ned[/name_m] as a nn for [name_m]Edward[/name_m] come from the phrase “mine [name_m]Ed[/name_m]”, which was a term of endearment I believe, and later became “my [name_m]Ned[/name_m]”. So I image [name_m]Ted[/name_m] has a similar origin as that as a nn for [name_m]Edward[/name_m].

As said above, it makes sense to me that [name_m]Ted[/name_m] comes from a possible Old [name_f]English[/name_f] pronunciation of [name_m]Theodore[/name_m] as tee-oh-door. [name_m]Ted[/name_m] is easier to see with that pronunciation.

I prefer [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] as a nn for [name_m]Theodore[/name_m] rather than [name_m]Edward[/name_m]

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Darling either way! Or [name_u]Thaddeus[/name_u] nn [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] works too.

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Ted is a short form for both [name_m]Edward[/name_m] and [name_m]Theodore[/name_m]. And [name_m]Edmund[/name_m], and [name_m]Edgar[/name_m], and [name_m]Edwin[/name_m], and [name_u]Thaddeus[/name_u], and Theodosius. And, personally I would also get creative because I love unexpected nicknames, and would happily use it for [name_m]Evander[/name_m], [name_m]Everard[/name_m], [name_u]Everett[/name_u], [name_u]Emmett[/name_u].

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My brain would automatically assume their name was Tedward :joy: if they nickname was [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] and their name is [name_m]Edward[/name_m], I can see it as both jokes aside and think it’s adorable I love the nn [name_u]Teddy[/name_u]!

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For some reason I see [name_u]Teddy[/name_u] as more of a nickname for ‘[name_m]Ed[/name_m]’ names, I couldnt tell you why though!

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Hahaha Tedward

Nickname would work well for either

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I thought [name_m]Theodore[/name_m].

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