The name of Nick rhyming a bad word

Hi everyone,
It would be great if you guide me in this matter. [name_f]My[/name_f] favourite name was Nickrod, it is a Persian name but it can be called [name_u]Nick[/name_u] at the end. I asked some friends to see if it rhymes with any word that has a bad or negative meaning. I got some answers and get concerned about a bad word that rhymes with [name_u]Nick[/name_u], it is exactly like [name_u]Nick[/name_u] but instead of N, it starts with D, which is an insult.
I know [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is a famous and common name in the UK but I really get worried about its similarity with that word ([name_f]Di[/name_f]…) that can be used at school to bully the child.
Shall I take it seriously? [name_u]Or[/name_u] you think it’s very unlikely that students or others relate that word to the name of [name_u]Nick[/name_u].

I’d say it’s fine. I knew people named [name_u]Nick[/name_u] and [name_u]Nicky[/name_u] at school and I never heard any teasing about the rhyme.

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Welcome to Nameberry!

This is a really interesting question. I would say that, normally, [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is such a familiar name that the rhyming word doesn’t really come to mind. I live in the UK and I have never heard anyone named [name_u]Nick[/name_u] being teased due to the D word.

However, I have to say that the full name Nickrod might be a different story, unfortunately. The problem is that the “rod” part kind of reinforces the first syllable.

It’s by no means unusable, but I wanted to give an honest answer to your question.

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Nick is a very popular name where I live (US, where it’s usually short for [name_m]Nicholas[/name_m] though I’ve known a [name_u]Nikola[/name_u] “[name_u]Nick[/name_u]” too), and I’ve never heard this.

I’ve actually also met a couple of [name_m]Richards[/name_m] who go by [name_m]Dick[/name_m], which is also an established name.

I’d say you’re fine with [name_u]Nick[/name_u]. :slight_smile:

That said, I do agree with @katinka’s point about Nickrod as a full version.

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I know so many Nicks short for [name_m]Nicholas[/name_m] I don’t think it’s a problem. Here in the U.K. the association is much more with [name_m]Richard[/name_m] as [name_m]Dick[/name_m] was originally a shortening of [name_m]Richard[/name_m].

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Thank you for your reply.
Sorry, I didn’t get your point about the “rod” part. [name_m]Can[/name_m] you please explain it to me?
Also, it can be spelled in a different way such as Nickraad or Nickrad. I don’t know which of these will sound as ‘a’ in ‘all’.

UK here too, and I’ve never heard teasing for [name_u]Nick[/name_u], and I know a few

The [name_m]Rod[/name_m] comments are suggesting that here in the UK (I’m not sure where you’re from, but maybe in other places too), [name_m]Rod[/name_m] is used as a slang term for the rhyming D word.

Nick alone is fine, but you’d be pushing further connotations with the rod part, like a potential double D joke. Have you considered other ‘[name_u]Nick[/name_u]’ names?

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Since [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is a common nickname, I never actually realised what it rhymes with. I simply didn’t pay attention.
Although the second part might be problematic.

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@rbrouy

This reply :point_up_2: explains the problem with the “rod” part really well. It’s not particularly common as slang terms go, and there are also [name_f]English[/name_f] names including [name_m]Rod[/name_m], such as [name_m]Rodney[/name_m] or [name_m]Roderick[/name_m]. But I just think in combination with the first syllable it could be teasable, and it sounds like you’re thinking about that and want to avoid it where possible.

Nickrad would be an excellent solution. You could also use [name_u]Nico[/name_u]/Niko or [name_m]Rad[/name_m] for short, both of which sound very cool to me :sunglasses:

Good luck!

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Nick is so well known I think it would be fine

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I think [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is fine and definitely usable. I know [name_u]Nick[/name_u]’s and I don’t think they’ve ever been called that from what I know of.

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I wouldn’t use Nickrod since that could invite bullying for sure. [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is fine.

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In the US, [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is so common, it wouldn’t be an issue.

However, as others have mentioned, rod can be used at the end of an insult like [name_m]Nimrod[/name_m] (a mild insult), so the whole name Nickrod could draw some negative attention.

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Confirming this is also a thing in the US.

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I think the rod with the [name_u]Nick[/name_u] would make it an issue. I’d also, preemptively warn you against [name_m]Aryan[/name_m] (as it is so popular in Iran).
I live in Qazvin, but I’m American. Some of my favorite Turkish/ Persian/ Kurdish boys’ names…
[name_u]Dylan[/name_u] (Kurdish)
[name_u]Liam[/name_u] (Persian)
[name_m]Kavan[/name_m] (Persian)
Farhad (Persian)
[name_f]Sina[/name_f] (Arabic, I think)
[name_m]Cyrus[/name_m] (Persian)
[name_m]Darius[/name_m] (Persian)
[name_m]Aryo[/name_m] (like in Barzan… Persian)
[name_m]Artin[/name_m] (Persian)
[name_m]Aram[/name_m] (Persian)
[name_u]Arman[/name_u] (Persian)
[name_u]Kamran[/name_u] (Persian)
[name_m]Keyvan[/name_m] (Persian)
[name_m]Kaveh[/name_m] (Persian… my son’s name)
Kasra (Persian… I’m not a big fan, but my husband loves it)
[name_m]Soren[/name_m] (Surena… Persian)
[name_m]Kian[/name_m] (Persian)
Mahan (Persian)
Matin (Persian)
Radin (Persian)
Bardia (Persian)
[name_u]Pasha[/name_u] (Turkish)
[name_m]Koray[/name_m] (Turkish)
[name_m]Emre[/name_m] (Turkish)
Enver (Turkish)
[name_m]Ender[/name_m] (Turkish)
[name_u]Evren[/name_u] (Turkish)

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My husband is named [name_m]Nicholas[/name_m], goes by [name_u]Nick[/name_u], and hasn’t ever run into this issue. He has only heard [name_m]Saint[/name_m] [name_u]Nick[/name_u] (like [name_f]Santa[/name_f] [name_m]Claus[/name_m]) and Nickeloden (kids’ TV [name_f]Channel[/name_f]), and they were pretty far between. I think it is a common enough NICKname (:wink: that you won’t have any issues.

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I would think “[name_u]Nick[/name_u] the pr!ck is being a d!ck.” But You should be fine because it is a well known name.

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Yeah agreed- [name_u]Nick[/name_u] so common in the US that no one even thinks that deeply about it to realize it rhymes with [name_m]Dick[/name_m]. There are also other names that do, [name_m]Rick[/name_m], [name_m]Mick[/name_m] for example. [name_m]Richard[/name_m] has the nickname [name_m]Dick[/name_m] so thats the one that gets called out. [name_u]Nick[/name_u] is definitely not on the radar for that.

Rod is a slang term for dick, although not really a common one. The name [name_m]Rod[/name_m] or [name_m]Rodney[/name_m] would be fine but for some reason [name_m]Rod[/name_m] at the end of a name versus the beginning seems more inviting to teasing over that. At least in the US. It doesn’t make total sense right but that’s how it is for whatever reason!

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