✨ What Can We Tell From the Unique Names in States’ Top 100s?

Hello nerds, aliens, [name_u]Harry[/name_u] [name_m]Styles[/name_m] stans, Scorpios, T-Rexes with grabber claws, and everyone in between! [name_u]Welcome[/name_u] to my thread :grin:

A couple weeks ago, the United States SSA released the extended name data set, including the top 100 names of each and every state (plus DC). This left me wondering about which state had the most interesting top 100, and which names appeared in each top 100 but not in the national data? So I did what any slightly obsessed stats nerd and fully obsessed name nerd does in this corner of the internet and I learned how to use Excel so I could turn these stats into games. It was a lot of threads. I had fun! But there are a lot of states in this country. Like… wow. And here I am, 51 create-a-families later, ready to share some of my findings!

I’m also going to link the Google Sheets with each state’s unique names listed if anyone is curious! Now let’s get into it:

*Note: I included DC in these stats because they’re listed as their own data set on the SSA site. That is why there are 51 entries here instead of 50!


Section 1: The analysis
This might seem like I’m putting the cart before the horse but stay with me, I have a point here. Before revealing the stats by state, I wanted to share what trends I picked up on that impacted a state’s potential to have unique names. I created 2-5 of those CAFs per day, and got pretty good at predicting whether a state would have more or fewer unique names because of these factors.

Take a look

Factors that impact the uniqueness of the lists:

  • Culture — including, but not limited to, states with higher/more Latinx, Jewish, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and black populations/communities. Similarly, states in the Deep [name_u]South[/name_u], states closer to Mexico, or states with more European influence, specifically from the UK, among others.

  • Style — I guess you could see this as the naming culture but since that’s more subjective and only officially recognized in corners like this one, I’m separating it. I identified a few styles that would cause more unique names to be present including country, hipster, city, traditional, and nature. There are arguably more styles present but I feel like many of them are more accurately covered by the previous bullet (for example, the beachy style of [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u]. I think we associate NH/PI names as being beachy so including an extra beachy style would just be redundant).

  • Number of births/length of lists — The states with fewer births tended to have more names on their list due to ties: the longest “top 100” lists belonged to the DC, [name_u]Maine[/name_u], and [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] girls, which recorded 113 names each. This is significant because it means [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] had 13 more opportunities to include unique names when compared to [name_u]California[/name_u], which recorded exactly 100 baby girl names. However, [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] had 13 slots that could’ve gone to names like [name_f]Camila[/name_f], [name_f]Grace[/name_f], and [name_f]Sadie[/name_f], which were recorded on both the national and Californian charts, and it would’ve only taken 5 births to get them there, and [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] parents chose not to, perhaps for one of the reasons above. I think at some point in the middle of the dataset, it becomes less of a confounding variable, but it absolutely factored into the states with the most and least unique names.

States with a more white, suburban feel tended to have fewer unique names. I say this as someone who is white and has lived in suburbs her whole life, and who saw 2 of the 6 states she’s lived in make the list of least unique namers.


Section 2: The Most [name_u]Unique[/name_u] States
In this section, we take a look at the states with the most unique names in their top 100. I have a more in-depth analysis of ranks 1-5 and included the top 10 as honorable mentions (well, 12 due to ties).

Here’s your treasure

Most unique states:
[name_u]Hawaii[/name_u] :desert_island:— To make the Hawaiian charts, which included 112 names on both lists, a name had to have been given to at least 11 boys or 8 girls. [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u] registered a whopping 84 total unique names, 40 for boys and 44 for girls. Some particularly exciting inclusions on the Hawaiian charts were [name_f]Lilinoe[/name_f], [name_f]Kailea[/name_f], and [name_f]Anela[/name_f] for girls, and [name_m]Kaizen[/name_m], [name_u]Reef[/name_u], and [name_m]Nakoa[/name_m] for boys. Some national chart toppers left on the shores of mainland [name_u]North[/name_u] [name_u]America[/name_u] include [name_u]Hazel[/name_u], [name_f]Leah[/name_f], [name_f]Victoria[/name_f], [name_m]Sebastian[/name_m], [name_m]Matthew[/name_m], and [name_m]Anthony[/name_m]. I found that [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u] was most impacted by the culture factor, as many of their unique names come from Native Hawaiian and [name_m]Pacific[/name_m] Islander languages and traditions.

[name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] :water_buffalo:— The list of top girl names in [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] was tied for the longest, registering 113 names, and the boys surpassed the 100 mark as well, coming in at 103. Only 6 boys were given the lowest ranking names, and the girls’ list went down to the national threshold of 5 babies. [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] recorded 82 total unique names, split in heavy favor for the girls: 49, compared to 33 on the boys’ side. Notable picks by parents in [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] include [name_f]Evelynn[/name_f], [name_f]Wrenley[/name_f], and [name_u]Bentley[/name_u] for girls, and [name_m]Augustus[/name_m], [name_u]Bridger[/name_u], and [name_u]Paxton[/name_u] for boys. However, they chose to leave out [name_f]Camila[/name_f], [name_f]Gianna[/name_f], and [name_f]Grace[/name_f], [name_u]Julian[/name_u], [name_u]Gabriel[/name_u], and [name_u]Jayden[/name_u], from the future class of 2039/2040. The [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] girls had the most unique top 100 names, and I think it boils down to a combination of style (the country style, featuring rugged, unisex, and sassy-sounding names fit for a cowgirl being prominent here) and numbers, seeing as how [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] had one of the longest lists and the lowest thresholds to make it.

[name_m]Washington[/name_m] D.C. :us:— While not technically a state, the SSA collects data for the babies born in the country’s capital, the District of [name_f]Columbia[/name_f], and they did not disappoint. DC also had long lists, recording 102 boy names and 113 girl names, and the cut-off to make the lists were 11 boys and 9 girls. The boys had 37 unique names on their list, while the girls included 42 on theirs, coming out to a total of 79 unique names. Tucked between two of the least unique states (spoiler), DC parents made sure to keep [name_u]Dream[/name_u], [name_f]Yara[/name_f], and [name_u]Dior[/name_u], and [name_u]Cairo[/name_u], [name_u]Remy[/name_u], and [name_m]Desmond[/name_m] in the capital’s limits. They also let [name_f]Virginia[/name_f], [name_u]Maryland[/name_u], and the rest of the country keep [name_f]Ellie[/name_f], [name_f]Aurora[/name_f], and [name_u]Addison[/name_u], and [name_u]Hudson[/name_u], [name_u]Grayson[/name_u], and [name_u]Lincoln[/name_u] from the national data. I believe the diplomacy aspect of DC helped it reach its status of uniqueness as DC parents took inspiration from many corners of the world. It also had a distinctly city style, including names that felt urban and modern.

[name_u]Montana[/name_u] :sunrise_over_mountains: — Montanan parents overflowed their top 100 lists as well, forcing it to include 110 boy names and 103 girl names. In order to make the charts, a name had to be bestowed upon at least 11 boys or 10 girls (and, in case you were wondering, this theme of fewer girl names being needed to make the list was true for every single state!). There were more unique boy names this time, with that number coming in at 41, while the girls had 37 unique names, totaling 78 for the state. More than the rest of the country, Montanans love the names [name_f]Jocelyn[/name_f], [name_u]Remington[/name_u], and [name_f]Mabel[/name_f] for girls, and [name_m]Colter[/name_m], [name_m]Stetson[/name_m], and [name_u]Judah[/name_u] for boys. Some names missing among the wide open spaces of [name_u]Montana[/name_u] include [name_f]Sofia[/name_f], [name_f]Penelope[/name_f], and [name_u]Zoe[/name_u] for girls, and [name_m]Mateo[/name_m], [name_u]Aiden[/name_u], and [name_u]Joseph[/name_u] for boys. Similar to [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], the names on these lists had a distinct country feel, and they benefitted from the numbers game as well.

[name_m]Vermont[/name_m] :maple_leaf:— Once again, Vermont’s list spilled beyond the 100 name limit, including 107 boy names and 103 girl names, the last of which were given to 6 boys and 5 girls. [name_m]Vermont[/name_m] had 76 unique names, which included 39 for boys and 37 for girls. Parents of the [name_u]Green[/name_u] [name_m]Mountain[/name_m] State loved names like [name_u]Scout[/name_u], [name_u]Rowan[/name_u], and [name_f]Ruth[/name_f] for girls, and [name_u]Avery[/name_u], [name_m]Otis[/name_m], and [name_u]Wilder[/name_u] for boys. Names left behind for regular mountain states (West Virginia), and others, include [name_f]Mila[/name_f], [name_f]Eliana[/name_f], and [name_f]Naomi[/name_f], and [name_m]Isaac[/name_m], [name_u]Dylan[/name_u], and [name_u]Elias[/name_u]. While I can see some influence from across the pond in Vermont’s names, as well as the nature style I mentioned earlier, I think they were helped a lot by the numbers.

Honorable mentions:
6. [name_u]North[/name_u] [name_u]Dakota[/name_u] — 75 unique names, 37 boys and 38 girls
7. Mississippi — 74 unique names, 36 boys and 38 girls
8. [name_u]Maine[/name_u] — 63 unique names, 29 boys and 34 girls
9. [name_u]Utah[/name_u] — 62 unique names, 29 boys and 33 girls
10. [name_u]New[/name_u] Mexico — 61 unique names, 23 boys and 38 girls
11. [name_u]South[/name_u] [name_u]Dakota[/name_u] — 61 unique names, 32 boys and 29 girls
12. [name_u]West[/name_u] [name_f]Virginia[/name_f] — 61 unique names, 29 boys and 32 girls


Section 3: The Most… On-Trend States
Nope, I’m gonna say it, they’re boring. These were the states that some could argue are just following national trends, keeping up with what the average person in the country is naming their kid nowadays, but that I would argue just have the least imagination. ^ [name_u]Read[/name_u] that with a slightly sarcastic tone, anyone who knows me in real life knows that my voice naturally sounds that way anyways.

The burn book

Most on-trend (boring) states:

[name_f]Virginia[/name_f] :heart:— I’ll admit, I was keeping track of this and did my best to predict which states would come out as the most on-trend (similar to the national data) or, as I see it, boring. On one of the last days of my series, I predicted that [name_u]North[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f] would hold onto the title but I did say that if any state was likely to beat them, it would be [name_f]Virginia[/name_f]. So I wasn’t completely wrong. [name_f]Virginia[/name_f] registered only 18 unique names total, split evenly between the boys and girls. They had 100 boy names and 101 girl names on their list, and the number of babies needed to get there were 96 boys and 71 girls.

[name_u]North[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f] :goat:— The top 100 lists in [name_u]North[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f] were almost perfect, aside from one extra girl name to account for a tie. Parents in [name_u]North[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f] kept up with the national data well, only including 24 unique names on their lists, also split evenly for boys and girls. Their bottom names were given to 129 boys and 91 girls—yes, a far cry from the 6 boys and 5 girls from [name_m]Vermont[/name_m] and [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f].

Illinois :dash:— The first caf that I made where I said, “yeesh, this is gonna be a small family…” They only had 25 unique names on their list, 12 for boys and 13 for girls. Illinois had 101 names on their boy list and 100 names for girls, and these last spots belonged to 127 boys and 98 girls.

Pennsylvania :bell:— I’m upset to see my own birth state on here but I guess I’m not surprised, seeing as popularity has always been a grievance I’ve had about my own name. They had 26 unique names, including 11 boys and 15 girls. Pennsylvania had 100 names on their boy list and 101 names on their girls’, and to get there, names had to be repeated 143 times for boys and 99 for girls.

[name_u]Maryland[/name_u] :crab:— [name_u]Maryland[/name_u] had 29 unique names, coming in at 16 for boys and 13 for girls. Their lists were both 101 names long, and these 101st spots belonged to names given to 63 boys and 47 girls.

The rest of the bottom 10:
46. [name_f]Florida[/name_f] — 30 unique names, 13 boys and 17 girls
45. [name_u]Colorado[/name_u] — 32 unique names, 17 boys and 15 girls
45. [name_m]Washington[/name_m] — 32 unique names, 14 boys and 18 girls
43. [name_f]Georgia[/name_f] — 33 unique names, 17 boys and 16 girls
42. [name_u]Tennessee[/name_u] — 34 unique names, 19 boys and 15 girls


Section 4: The Most [name_u]Unique[/name_u] of the [name_u]Unique[/name_u]
Heading into the specific names, these were the names that only appeared on one state’s top 100, along with their national ranking. I guess you could call these the diamonds.

For your viewing pleasure

Names that only appeared in 1 state’s top 100 (and their national ranking!)

Names with a * didn’t make the top 1000

Boys:
[name_m]Abel[/name_m], 196 (Maine)
[name_u]Alex[/name_u], 194 (North Dakota)
[name_u]Ali[/name_u], 339 (Michigan)
[name_m]Atticus[/name_m], 266 (Alaska)
[name_m]Augustus[/name_m], 457 (Wyoming)
[name_m]Aziel[/name_m], 332 (New Mexico)
[name_u]Blake[/name_u], 205 (Michigan)
[name_m]Briggs[/name_m], 372 (North Dakota)
[name_u]Brody[/name_u], 186 (Alaska)
[name_u]Bryce[/name_u], 250 (Delaware)
[name_u]Cairo[/name_u], 323 (DC)
[name_u]Callum[/name_u], 273 (Montana)
[name_m]Cash[/name_m], 253 (Montana)
[name_u]Cody[/name_u], 312 (Wyoming)
[name_m]Colin[/name_m], 269 (Massachusetts)
[name_m]Colson[/name_m], 322 (West Virginia)
[name_m]Colter[/name_m], 627 (Montana)
[name_u]Dallas[/name_u], 270 (Alabama)
[name_m]Desmond[/name_m], 355 (DC)
[name_u]Elliott[/name_u], 169 (Washington)
[name_m]Eric[/name_m], 213 (Vermont)
[name_u]Finnegan[/name_u], 376 (New Hampshire)
[name_m]Gunner[/name_m], 324 (West Virginia)
[name_u]Jensen[/name_u], 303 (West Virginia)
[name_m]Joel[/name_m], 211 (DC)
[name_u]Jonah[/name_u], 140 (Vermont)
[name_u]Judah[/name_u], 183 (Montana)
[name_u]Kade[/name_u], 380 (Hawaii)
[name_u]Kaimana[/name_u], 2981 (Hawaii) *
[name_u]Kainoa[/name_u], 1885 (Hawaii) *
[name_m]Kaito[/name_m], 2090 (Hawaii) *
[name_m]Kaizen[/name_m], 1224 (Hawaii) *
[name_m]Kaleb[/name_m], 245 (Mississippi)
[name_u]Kameron[/name_u], 343 (Mississippi)
[name_m]Kanoa[/name_m], 3512 (Hawaii) *
[name_u]Karson[/name_u], 304 (Mississippi)
[name_m]Kash[/name_m], 240 (Mississippi)
[name_m]Kayson[/name_m], 283 (Mississippi)
[name_m]Keanu[/name_m], 532 (Hawaii)
[name_m]Kenzo[/name_m], 530 (Hawaii)
[name_u]Koa[/name_u], 546 (Hawaii)
[name_m]Kyson[/name_m], 467 (Mississippi)
[name_u]Lawson[/name_u], 362 (Mississippi)
[name_m]Louis[/name_m], 251 (Minnesota)
[name_m]Makoa[/name_m], 1902 (Hawaii) *
[name_m]Malakai[/name_m], 256 (Hawaii)
[name_m]Matias[/name_m], 225 (Texas)
[name_m]Mohamed[/name_m], 531 (Minnesota)
[name_m]Muhammad[/name_m], 306 (New York)
[name_m]Nakoa[/name_m], 1610 (Hawaii) *
[name_m]Nixon[/name_m], 695 (Utah)
[name_u]Ocean[/name_u], 711 (Hawaii)
[name_u]Orion[/name_u], 314 (Hawaii)
[name_m]Oscar[/name_m], 226 (Vermont)
[name_m]Otis[/name_m], 647 (Vermont)
[name_m]Paul[/name_m], 257 (North Dakota)
[name_u]Reef[/name_u], 1904 (Hawaii) *
[name_u]Remy[/name_u], 357 (DC)
[name_m]Richard[/name_m], 216 (Delaware)
[name_u]Riley[/name_u], 246 (Maine)
[name_m]Ronan[/name_m], 274 (Alaska)
[name_m]Soren[/name_m], 537 (North Dakota)
[name_u]Tate[/name_u], 305 (Iowa)
[name_m]Yaakov[/name_m], 966 (New Jersey)
[name_m]Yehuda[/name_m], 822 (New Jersey)
[name_m]Yosef[/name_m], 676 (New Jersey)
[name_m]Zayden[/name_m], 204 (New Mexico)

Girls:
[name_f]Adaline[/name_f], 289 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Aitana[/name_f], 364 (New Mexico)
[name_u]Alani[/name_u], 183 (Delaware)
[name_f]Alayah[/name_f], 323 (New Mexico)
[name_f]Alia[/name_f], 592 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Alivia[/name_f], 273 (North Dakota)
[name_f]Aliyah[/name_f], 208 (New Mexico)
[name_f]Amaia[/name_f], 640 (Rhode Island)
[name_u]Amari[/name_u], 333 (New Mexico)
[name_f]Ana[/name_f], 235 (Texas)
[name_f]Anela[/name_f], 3320 (Hawaii) *
[name_f]Annabelle[/name_f], 274 (Maine)
[name_f]Ariyah[/name_f], 346 (Mississippi)
[name_u]Armani[/name_u], 469 (Louisiana)
[name_f]Astrid[/name_f], 438 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Aurelia[/name_f], 516 (Vermont)
[name_f]Avianna[/name_f], 354 (New Mexico)
[name_u]Bentley[/name_u], 1553 (Wyoming) *
[name_f]Brooklynn[/name_f], 314 (Mississippi)
[name_u]Cali[/name_u], 337 (Rhode Island)
[name_u]Camille[/name_u], 281 (Louisiana)
[name_f]Catherine[/name_f], 325 (DC)
[name_f]Charlee[/name_f], 272 (West Virginia)
[name_f]Charleigh[/name_f], 488 (Mississippi)
[name_f]Daleyza[/name_f], 412 (New Mexico)
[name_f]Demi[/name_f], 366 (Louisiana)
[name_f]Diana[/name_f], 225 (DC)
[name_u]Dior[/name_u], 542 (DC)
[name_f]Elaina[/name_f], 257 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Elianna[/name_f], 360 (New Mexico)
[name_f]Elise[/name_f], 243 (Maine)
[name_f]Emberly[/name_f], 538 (Wyoming)
[name_u]Esme[/name_u], 379 (Maine)
[name_f]Esmeralda[/name_f], 453 (Nevada)
[name_f]Esperanza[/name_f], 1108 (New Mexico) *
[name_f]Evelynn[/name_f], 320 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Everlee[/name_f], 376 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Faith[/name_f], 169 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Frances[/name_f], 393 (DC)
[name_f]Freyja[/name_f], 709 (Alaska)
[name_f]Gemma[/name_f], 191 (Maine)
[name_f]Gracelyn[/name_f], 356 (West Virginia)
[name_f]Hadlee[/name_f], 747 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Haisley[/name_f], 479 (South Dakota)
[name_f]Halia[/name_f], 2924 (Hawaii) *
[name_f]Hallie[/name_f], 317 (Iowa)
[name_u]Hayden[/name_u], 290 (Montana)
[name_u]Holland[/name_u], 638 (Utah)
[name_f]Jasmine[/name_f], 170 (Nevada)
[name_f]Jocelyn[/name_f], 292 (Montana)
[name_u]Journey[/name_u], 267 (Georgia)
[name_f]Julianna[/name_f], 301 (Delaware)
[name_f]Kailani[/name_f], 275 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Kailea[/name_f], 4105 (Hawaii) *
[name_u]Kalani[/name_u], 338 (Mississippi)
[name_f]Kalea[/name_f], 1659 (Hawaii) *
[name_f]Kate[/name_f], 413 (Utah)
[name_f]Kayla[/name_f], 255 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Kaylani[/name_f], 282 (New Mexico)
[name_u]Kendall[/name_u], 305 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Kennedi[/name_f], 524 (Mississippi)
[name_f]Kiana[/name_f], 781 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Kiara[/name_f], 332 (New Mexico)
[name_u]Kimberly[/name_u], 220 (DC)
[name_f]Laila[/name_f], 242 (DC)
[name_f]Leia[/name_f], 299 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Lena[/name_f], 293 (DC)
[name_f]Lilinoe[/name_f], 6820 (Hawaii) *
[name_f]Mabel[/name_f], 375 (Montana)
[name_f]Mahina[/name_f], 4190 (Hawaii) *
[name_f]Maia[/name_f], 434 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Malaysia[/name_f], 617 (Mississippi)
[name_f]Malia[/name_f], 256 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Maren[/name_f], 439 (Wyoming)
[name_f]Milani[/name_f], 302 (Delaware)
[name_u]Morgan[/name_u], 205 (South Dakota)
[name_f]Mylah[/name_f], 514 (Nevada)
[name_u]Navy[/name_u], 452 (Utah)
[name_f]Nina[/name_f], 327 (DC)
[name_f]Nyla[/name_f], 227 (Nevada)
[name_f]Reina[/name_f], 614 (Hawaii)
[name_u]Rowan[/name_u], 241 (Vermont)
[name_u]Royalty[/name_u], 388 (Mississippi)
[name_f]Ruth[/name_f], 189 (Vermont)
[name_u]Scout[/name_u], 829 (Vermont)
[name_u]Skye[/name_u], 429 (Hawaii)
[name_f]Skyla[/name_f], 630 (Alaska)
[name_f]Sylvia[/name_f], 467 (Vermont)
[name_f]Sylvie[/name_f], 586 (North Dakota)
[name_f]Thea[/name_f], 312 (South Dakota)
[name_f]Valeria[/name_f], 157 (California)
[name_f]Willa[/name_f], 353 (South Dakota)
[name_f]Wrenley[/name_f], 498 (Wyoming)
[name_u]Wynter[/name_u], 344 (Mississippi)
[name_f]Xiomara[/name_f], 551 (New Mexico)
[name_f]Yara[/name_f], 659 (DC)
[name_f]Zara[/name_f], 213 (DC)
[name_f]Zariah[/name_f], 532 (New Mexico)
[name_u]Zia[/name_u], 1447 (New Mexico) *


Section 5: The Trends of the [name_u]Future[/name_u]?
In this section, you’ll find the names that made the most states’ lists (and their national rankings). I’m going to list the top 20 for boys and girls. These lists could help predict which names are more likely to break the top 100 in years to come!

A glimpse into the crystal ball?

Boys:
[name_u]Declan[/name_u] — present on 35 states’ lists, ranks 105 nationally
[name_m]Jaxson[/name_m] — present on 32 states’ lists, ranks 101 nationally
[name_u]Jace[/name_u] — present on 31 states’ lists, ranks 102 nationally
[name_u]Emmett[/name_u] — present on 30 states’ lists, ranks 103 nationally
[name_u]Rowan[/name_u] — present on 29 states’ lists, ranks 106 nationally
[name_u]Ryder[/name_u] — present on 29 states’ lists, ranks 111 nationally
[name_u]River[/name_u] — present on 28 states’ lists, ranks 110 nationally
[name_u]Sawyer[/name_u] — present on 28 states’ lists, ranks 114 nationally
[name_u]Ryker[/name_u] — present on 23 states’ lists, ranks 153 nationally
[name_u]Micah[/name_u] — present on 22 states’ lists, ranks 107 nationally
[name_u]August[/name_u] — present on 20 states’ lists, ranks 121 nationally
[name_m]Harrison[/name_m] — present on 20 states’ lists, ranks 120 nationally
[name_u]Rhett[/name_u] — present on 20 states’ lists, ranks 148 nationally
[name_u]Walker[/name_u] — present on 20 states’ lists, ranks 129 nationally
[name_m]Calvin[/name_m] — present on 19 states’ lists, ranks 145 nationally
[name_u]Milo[/name_u] — present on 19 states’ lists, ranks 127 nationally
[name_u]Archer[/name_u] — present on 18 states’ lists, ranks 138 nationally
[name_u]Bentley[/name_u] — present on 17 states’ lists, ranks 151 nationally
[name_m]Myles[/name_m] — present on 17 states’ lists, ranks 119 nationally

Girls:
[name_f]Clara[/name_f] — present on 30 states’ lists, ranks 102 nationally
[name_u]Hadley[/name_u] — present on 27 states’ lists, ranks 112 nationally
[name_f]Raelynn[/name_f] — present on 24 states’ lists, ranks 103 nationally
[name_f]Eloise[/name_f] — present on 23 states’ lists, ranks 109 nationally
[name_u]Josie[/name_u] — present on 23 states’ lists, ranks 130 nationally
[name_f]Lyla[/name_f] — present on 23 states’ lists, ranks 110 nationally
[name_u]Vivian[/name_u] — present on 23 states’ lists, ranks 101 nationally
[name_f]Eliza[/name_f] — present on 22 states’ lists, ranks 111 nationally
[name_f]Iris[/name_f] — present on 22 states’ lists, ranks 107 nationally
[name_f]Isabelle[/name_f] — present on 22 states’ lists, ranks 117 nationally
[name_u]Parker[/name_u] — present on 22 states’ lists, ranks 115 nationally
[name_f]Maeve[/name_f] — present on 21 states’ lists, ranks 124 nationally
[name_f]Adalynn[/name_f] — present on 19 states’ lists, ranks 119 nationally
[name_f]Margaret[/name_f] — present on 19 states’ lists, ranks 125 nationally
[name_u]Remi[/name_u] — present on 19 states’ lists, ranks 122 nationally
[name_f]Ayla[/name_f] — present on 18 states’ lists, ranks 108 nationally
[name_f]Rose[/name_f] — present on 18 states’ lists, ranks 116 nationally
[name_f]Emersyn[/name_f] — present on 17 states’ lists, ranks 148 nationally
[name_f]Magnolia[/name_f] — present on 17 states’ lists, ranks 140 nationally

(And since I was curious, here are the names ranked 101-110 and how many states’ lists they made)
Boys:
[name_m]Jaxson[/name_m] — 32
[name_u]Jace[/name_u] — 31
[name_u]Emmett[/name_u] — 30
[name_m]Adam[/name_m] — 11
[name_u]Declan[/name_u] — 35
[name_u]Rowan[/name_u] — 29
[name_u]Micah[/name_u] — 22
[name_u]Kayden[/name_u] — 16
[name_u]Gael[/name_u] — 7
[name_u]River[/name_u] — 28

Girls:
[name_u]Vivian[/name_u] — 23
[name_f]Clara[/name_f] — 30
[name_f]Raelynn[/name_f] — 24
[name_f]Liliana[/name_f] — 15
[name_f]Samantha[/name_f] — 13
[name_u]Maria[/name_u] —12
[name_f]Iris[/name_f] — 22
[name_f]Ayla[/name_f] — 18
[name_f]Eloise[/name_f] — 23
[name_f]Lyla[/name_f] — 23


Section 6: Miscellaneous
Here, I’ll include the full lists, along with some fun additions to the statistics.

Full lists

Number of unique names by state (total, B/G):
[name_f]Alabama[/name_f] - 49, 25/24
[name_u]Alaska[/name_u] - 55, 29/26
[name_u]Arizona[/name_u] - 37, 19/18
Arkansas - 47, 22/25
[name_u]California[/name_u] - 41, 21/20
[name_u]Colorado[/name_u] - 32, 17/15
Connecticut - 36, 17/19
Delaware - 46, 19/27
DC - 79, 37/42
[name_f]Florida[/name_f] - 30, 13/17
[name_f]Georgia[/name_f] - 33, 17/16
[name_u]Hawaii[/name_u] - 84, 40/44
Idaho - 59, 27/32
Illinois - 25, 12/13
[name_u]Indiana[/name_u] - 36, 18/18
[name_u]Iowa[/name_u] - 55, 30/25
[name_u]Kansas[/name_u] - 42, 20/22
Kentucky - 47, 21/26
[name_f]Louisiana[/name_f] - 51, 24/27
[name_u]Maine[/name_u] - 63, 29/34
[name_u]Maryland[/name_u] - 29, 16/13
Massachusetts - 40, 20/20
Michigan - 37, 19/18
Minnesota - 49, 26/23
Mississippi - 74, 36/38
[name_f]Missouri[/name_f] - 45, 24/21
[name_u]Montana[/name_u] - 78, 41/37
Nebraska - 47, 22/25
[name_u]Nevada[/name_u] - 42, 17/25
[name_u]New[/name_u] Hampshire - 56, 27/29
[name_u]New[/name_u] [name_u]Jersey[/name_u] - 44, 21/23
[name_u]New[/name_u] Mexico - 61, 23/38
[name_u]New[/name_u] [name_u]York[/name_u] - 37, 18/19
[name_u]North[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f] - 24, 12/12
[name_u]North[/name_u] [name_u]Dakota[/name_u] - 75, 37/38
Ohio - 36, 18/18
Oklahoma - 46, 21/25
Oregon - 38, 16/22
Pennsylvania - 26, 11/15
[name_f]Rhode[/name_f] [name_u]Island[/name_u] - 49, 22/27
[name_u]South[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f] - 36, 19/17
[name_u]South[/name_u] [name_u]Dakota[/name_u] - 61, 32/29
[name_u]Tennessee[/name_u] - 34, 19/15
[name_u]Texas[/name_u] - 36, 20/16
[name_u]Utah[/name_u] - 62, 29/33
[name_m]Vermont[/name_m] - 76, 39/37
[name_f]Virginia[/name_f] - 18, 9/9
[name_m]Washington[/name_m] - 32, 14/18
[name_u]West[/name_u] [name_f]Virginia[/name_f] - 61, 29/32
Wisconsin - 42, 24/18
[name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] - 82, 33/49

Fun facts about the Stats

Miscellaneous Stats Facts:

  • The Mississippi boys’ top 100 includes [name_u]Kingston[/name_u], [name_u]Karter[/name_u], [name_u]Kayden[/name_u], [name_m]Kaiden[/name_m], [name_u]Kyrie[/name_u], [name_m]Kash[/name_m], [name_m]Kayson[/name_m], [name_m]Kaleb[/name_m], [name_u]Karson[/name_u], [name_m]King[/name_m], [name_u]Kyler[/name_u], [name_u]Kameron[/name_u], and [name_m]Kyson[/name_m], which accounts for about 35% of the unique names in their top 100! This means they have more unique K names in their boy top 100 than Illinois, [name_u]North[/name_u] [name_f]Carolina[/name_f], and [name_f]Virginia[/name_f] have on their unique boy name list total! This K loving doesn’t stop there, as their girl list includes [name_f]Kehlani[/name_f], [name_f]Kylie[/name_f], [name_u]Kali[/name_u], [name_f]Kaylee[/name_f], [name_f]Kennedi[/name_f], [name_f]Khloe[/name_f], and [name_u]Kalani[/name_u]. Of all of these, [name_m]Kaleb[/name_m], [name_u]Kameron[/name_u], [name_u]Karson[/name_u], [name_m]Kash[/name_m], [name_m]Kayson[/name_m], [name_m]Kyson[/name_m], [name_u]Kalani[/name_u], and [name_f]Kennedi[/name_f] are unique to Mississippi’s top 100s.
  • [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u] had the most names unique only to their state, with 31 names total (15 boys and 16 girls). The other states with double digit unique names include [name_u]New[/name_u] Mexico (15), Mississippi (15), DC (14), and [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f] (13).
  • [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u] also had the most names make their top 100 that don’t make the top 1000 nationally: [name_u]Kaimana[/name_u], [name_u]Kainoa[/name_u], [name_m]Kaito[/name_m], [name_m]Kaizen[/name_m], [name_m]Kanoa[/name_m], [name_m]Makoa[/name_m], [name_m]Nakoa[/name_m], [name_u]Reef[/name_u], [name_f]Anela[/name_f], [name_f]Halia[/name_f], [name_f]Kailea[/name_f], [name_f]Kalea[/name_f], [name_f]Lilinoe[/name_f], and [name_f]Mahina[/name_f]. There were a couple other states who had unique girl names outside of the national top 1000, and these names include [name_u]Bentley[/name_u] (Wyoming), and [name_f]Esperanza[/name_f] and [name_u]Zia[/name_u] (New Mexico).
  • Some top ranked names nationally missing from the most unique lists include:

(National rank; states missing the name)
[name_m]Mateo[/name_m] (15; [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_m]Sebastian[/name_m] (19; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_u]Julian[/name_u] (33; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], Montana)
[name_u]Gabriel[/name_u] (38; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], Vermont)
[name_m]Isaac[/name_m] (40; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], Vermont)
[name_u]Jayden[/name_u] (41; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_m]Anthony[/name_m] (43; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_u]Dylan[/name_u] (44; [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_u]Elias[/name_u] (48; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_m]Josiah[/name_m] (49; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)

[name_f]Camila[/name_f] (12; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_f]Gianna[/name_f] (13; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_f]Sofia[/name_f] (18; [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_f]Mila[/name_f] (26; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], Vermont)
[name_f]Grace[/name_f] (34; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], Vermont)
[name_f]Emilia[/name_f] (40; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], Montana)
[name_f]Victoria[/name_f] (43; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_u]Addison[/name_u] (45; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], DC)
[name_f]Leah[/name_f] (46; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_f]Eliana[/name_f] (48; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], [name_u]Montana[/name_u], Vermont)
[name_f]Ivy[/name_f] (49; [name_f]Wyoming[/name_f], DC)
[name_u]Everly[/name_u] (50; [name_u]Hawaii[/name_u], DC)


Links to the states’ lists:
Boys
Girls

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This is thrilling. Thank you so much!

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:clap: this has been gripping! i dread to think how long this took :joy: thanks for this

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Super interesting :slight_smile: Thank you!

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Thank you for doing this, [name_u]Abby[/name_u]! It’s fascinating to look through.

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So I did something very similar but I also wanted to see how names that were within the top 100 fared in different states. I created a very imprecise system in which I looked at the difference between the # position on the U.S. list and # position on state list. The difference to be “significant” grew larger as I went down the list because there weren’t as many babies being named that name. There are many, many limitations to using my system to determine “uniqueness”, especially for states with less population/births and using the number on the state list since the number rank doesn’t hold much meaning when the actual # of babies are all equal. But it does give me a good sense that in a certain state, more babies are being named [name_u]Maverick[/name_u] than [name_u]Michael[/name_u].

Sorry I didn’t explain it so well. I did it on Excel but I can copy the sheets to Google Sheets if people are interested in seeing what I compared.

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Wonderful work! Such fun to read! Thank you!

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This is absolutely fascinating! Thank you so much for sharing all these things

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[name_m]Can[/name_m] I nominate @SparkleNinja18 for some kind of super medal gold star for this post?! :medal_sports: Thank you so much for doing this. Very fun to read!

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I’m glad people have enjoyed it! :relaxed: I had fun making it (apart from when Sheets wouldn’t do what I wanted it to lol)